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    Penicillinase-Sensitive Penicillin Antibiotics

    DEA CLASS

    Rx

    DESCRIPTION

    Equimolar compound of procaine and penicillin G antibiotic for intramuscular use; tissue depot allows slow drug absorption with plateau type blood concentrations over several hours; used in moderately severe infections due to penicillin G susceptible organisms.

    COMMON BRAND NAMES

    Wycillin

    HOW SUPPLIED

    Penicillin/Penicillin G Procaine/Wycillin Intramuscular Inj Susp: 1mL, 2mL, 600000U, 1200000U

    DOSAGE & INDICATIONS

    For the treatment of moderately severe pneumococcal pneumonia, moderately severe to severe staphylococcal infections, and moderately severe to severe group A streptococcal (GAS) infections (tonsillitis, erysipelas, scarlet fever, upper respiratory tract infections, skin and skin structure infections).
    Intramuscular dosage
    Adults

    600,000 to 1.2 million units IM once daily. For group A streptococcal (GAS) infections, treat for at least 10 days.

    Children and Adolescents weighing 27 kg or more

    600,000 to 1.2 million units IM once daily. For group A streptococcal (GAS) infections, treat for at least 10 days.

    Infants and Children weighing less than 27 kg

    300,000 units IM once daily. For group A streptococcal (GAS) infections, treat for at least 10 days.

    For the treatment of subacute bacterial endocarditis due to penicillin-susceptible Group A streptococci.
    Intramuscular dosage
    Adults

    Clinical practice guidelines do not recommend penicillin G procaine for endocarditis. FDA-approved labeling recommends 600,000 to 1 million units IM once daily.

    For the treatment of fusospirochetosis or Vincent's infection (necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis or pharyngitis).
    Intramuscular dosage
    Adults

    600,000—1 million units IM daily.

    For the adjunctive treatment of diphtheria and to prevent establishment of carrier state.
    Intramuscular dosage
    Adults

    50,000 units/kg/dose IM once daily (Max: 1.2 million units/day) for 14 days as an adjunct to diphtheria antitoxin. The FDA-approved dose is 300,000 to 600,000 units IM once daily.

    Infants, Children, and Adolescents

    50,000 units/kg/dose IM once daily (Max: 1.2 million units/day) for 14 days as an adjunct to diphtheria antitoxin. The FDA-approved dose is 300,000 to 600,000 units IM once daily.

    For the treatment of rat-bite fever.
    Intramuscular dosage
    Adults

    600,000—1 million units IM daily.

    For anthrax prophylaxis after exposure to Bacillus anthracis (postexposure prophylaxis, PEP).
    Intramuscular dosage
    Adults

    600,000 units to 1.2 million units IM once or twice daily. Treat for 60 days. Penicillin G procaine is not included in the CDC's guidelines for anthrax in adults.

    Infants, Children, and Adolescents

    25,000 to 50,000 units/kg/dose IM once daily or 25,000 units/kg/dose IM twice daily (Max: 1.2 million units/dose). Treat for 60 days. Penicillin G procaine is not included in pediatric anthrax guidelines.

    For the treatment of syphilis, including neurosyphilis; yaws (Treponema pallidum ssp. pertenue); pinta (Treponema carateum); and bejel (Treponema pallidum ssp. endemicum).
    NOTE: The Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction may occur within the first 24 hours of therapy.
    For the treatment of primary, secondary, or early latent (less than 1 year duration) syphilis, yaws , pinta , and bejel.
    Intramuscular dosage
    Adults and Adolescents

    600,000 units IM once daily for 8 days. The CDC recommends penicillin G benzathine for syphilis.

    For the treatment of late latent (greater than 1 year duration) syphilis, yaws, pinta, and bejel.
    Intramuscular dosage
    Adults and Adolescents

    600,000 units IM once daily for 10 to 15 days. The CDC recommends penicillin G benzathine for syphilis.

    For the treatment of tertiary syphilis (patients with gumma and cardiovascular syphilis), yaws, pinta, and bejel.
    Intramuscular dosage
    Adults and Adolescents

    600,000 units IM once daily for 10 to 15 days. The CDC recommends penicillin G benzathine for syphilis.

    For the treatment of neurosyphilis.
    Intramuscular dosage
    Adults and Adolescents

    As an alternative to aqueous crystalline penicillin G and when compliance can be ensured, guidelines recommend 2.4 million units IM once daily plus probenecid 500 mg PO 4 times a day, both given for 10 to 14 days. The CDC suggests that penicillin G benzathine 2.4 million units IM once weekly for up to 3 successive weeks after the completion of a neurosyphilis regimen may be considered to provide a comparable duration of treatment for late syphilis. For HIV-infected patients, guidelines recommend follow-up therapy of benzathine penicillin 2.4 million units IM once weekly for 3 weeks after completion of procaine penicillin G and probenecid therapy. The manufacturer recommends penicillin G procaine 600,000 units IM once daily for 10 to 15 days.

    For the treatment of congenital syphilis.
    NOTE: Current CDC guidelines should be consulted to determine the appropriate course of treatment in neonates born to mothers with syphilis. Therapy is based on physical examination, serum quantitive nontreponemal serologic titer, and whether or not the mother was treated properly before delivery.
    Intramuscular dosage
    Infants and Children

    Any child older than 1 month suspected of having congenital syphilis or who has neurologic involvement should be treated with aqueous penicillin G. During an aqueous penicillin G shortage, penicillin G procaine 50,000 units/kg IM as a single daily injection (Max: 600,000 units/day) for 10 days may be considered. If more than 1 day of therapy is missed, the entire course should be restarted.

    Neonates

    50,000 units/kg IM once daily as a single injection for 10 days as an option. If more than 1 day of therapy is missed, the entire course should be restarted.

    For diphtheria carriage eradication.
    Intramuscular dosage
    Adults

    300,000 units IM once daily for 10 days.

    Infants, Children, and Adolescents

    300,000 units IM once daily for 10 days.

    MAXIMUM DOSAGE

    Adults

    2.4 million units/day IM; 4.8 million units/day IM has been recommended by guidelines.

    Geriatric

    2.4 million units/day IM; 4.8 million units/day IM  has been recommended by guidelines.

    Adolescents

    50,000 units/kg/day IM up to 2.4 million units/day IM..

    Children

    50,000 units/kg/day IM up to 2.4 million units/day IM.

    Infants

    50,000 units/kg/day IM.

    Neonates

    50,000 units/kg/day IM.

    DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

    Hepatic Impairment

    No dosage adjustment required.

    Renal Impairment

    Penicillin G is rapidly eliminated via renal tubular excretion and clearance is significantly delayed in patients with decreased renal function. Specific dosage adjustment recommendations are not available for penicillin G procaine.
     
    Intermittent hemodialysis
    Penicillin G is removed during hemodialysis.

    ADMINISTRATION

    Injectable Administration

    For intramuscular administration only. NEVER administer intravenously.
    Visually inspect parenteral products for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration whenever solution and container permit.

    Intramuscular Administration

    No dilution or reconstitution necessary.
    Shake well before using.
    Administer by deep IM injection. Inject into the upper, outer quadrant of the buttock (dorsogluteal) or the ventrogluteal site. In neonates, infants, and small children, the midlateral aspect of the thigh may be preferred.
    Administration in the anterolateral thigh is not recommended as quadriceps femoris fibrosis and atrophy have been reported after repeated IM injections of penicillin preparations into the anterolateral thigh.
    When doses are repeated, vary the injection site.
    Because of the high concentration of suspended material in this product, the needle may be blocked if the injection is not made at a slow, steady rate.[31217]

    STORAGE

    Generic:
    - Protect from freezing
    - Refrigerate (between 36 and 46 degrees F)
    Wycillin:
    - Protect from freezing
    - Refrigerate (between 36 and 46 degrees F)

    CONTRAINDICATIONS / PRECAUTIONS

    Asthma, carbapenem hypersensitivity, cephalosporin hypersensitivity, penicillin hypersensitivity

    Penicillin is contraindicated for use in patients with penicillin hypersensitivity. Penicillin should be used cautiously in patients with cephalosporin hypersensitivity or carbapenem hypersensitivity. Due its structural similarity to the cephalosporins and imipenem, these patients are more susceptible to cross-hypersensitivity reactions. Penicillin can cause a variety of hypersensitivity reactions ranging from mild rash to fatal anaphylaxis. Patients with allergies or allergic conditions including asthma may have a greater risk for hypersensitivity reactions to penicillins. Penicillin hypersensitivity has been reported by up to 10% of the population. Of the 10% with penicillin hypersensitivity, more than 80% do not have penicillin-specific IgE antibodies. It is suggested that patients experiencing penicillin hypersensitivity should not be re-challenged. However, one study evaluated the rate of penicillin resensitization in patients with a history of IgE-mediated penicillin allergy. Patients (n=53 adults) who had a negative penicillin skin test received 3 successive 10 day courses of penicillin V potassium (250 mg PO three times daily). Prior to each course, a penicillin skin test was done; skin tests were performed a minimum of 4 weeks after completing a course of penicillin. Forty-six patients completed the study and none developed a positive skin test to penicillin. Penicillin G procaine is contraindicated in any patient with a history of a procaine hypersensitivity reaction. Patients with a history of sensitivity can be given a test dose of procaine intradermally (0.1 ml of a 1—2% procaine solution); development of erythema, wheal, flare, or eruption indicates procaine sensitivity and penicillin G procaine preparations should not be used.

    Intraarterial administration, intravenous administration

    Penicillin G procaine is for deep intramuscular injection only. Take care to avoid intravenous administration or intraarterial administration or injection into or near major peripheral nerves or blood vessels, since such injections may produce neurovascular damage.

    C. difficile-associated diarrhea, diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis

    Consider pseudomembranous colitis in patients presenting with diarrhea after antibacterial use. Careful medical history is necessary as pseudomembranous colitis has been reported to occur over 2 months after the administration of antibacterial agents. Almost all antibacterial agents, such as penicillin G procaine, have been associated with pseudomembranous colitis or C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) which may range in severity from mild to life-threatening. Treatment with antibacterial agents alters the normal flora of the colon leading to overgrowth of C. difficile.

    Cardiac disease, G6PD deficiency, infants, methemoglobinemia, neonates, pulmonary disease

    Methemoglobinemia has been reported with local anesthetic use, such as procaine. Although all patients are at risk for methemoglobinemia, patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD deficiency), preexisting (congenital or idiopathic) methemoglobinemia, cardiac or pulmonary compromise (cardiac disease or pulmonary disease), neonates and infants younger than 6 months, and those with concurrent exposure to oxidizing agents or their metabolites are more susceptible to developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor such patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if a local anesthetic must be used. Signs of methemoglobinemia may occur immediately or may be delayed hours after exposure. Immediately discontinue the local anesthetic to avoid serious central nervous system and cardiovascular adverse events, as methemoglobin concentrations may continue to rise. Patients may require supportive care such as oxygen therapy and hydration. More severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.

    Renal failure, renal impairment

    Penicillin G is eliminated primarily unchanged via renal tubular secretion. With normal renal function the drug is rapidly eliminated. In individuals with renal impairment or renal failure, excretion is considerably delayed. Incomplete development of renal function in neonates and infants may delay elimination of penicillin. Dosages of penicillin G procaine may need to be reduced in these patients. Large doses of penicillin administered to patients with renal impairment have been associated with seizures.

    Geriatric

    Reported clinical experience with penicillin G procaine has not identified differences in responses between geriatric patients and younger adult patients. Since penicillin G procaine is known to be substantially excreted by the kidney and elderly patients may also have decreased renal function, care should be taken in dose selection. It may be useful to monitor renal function. The federal Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) regulates medication use in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). According to OBRA, use of antibiotics should be limited to confirmed or suspected bacterial infections. Antibiotics are non-selective and may result in the eradication of beneficial microorganisms while promoting the emergence of undesired ones, causing secondary infections such as oral thrush, colitis, or vaginitis. Any antibiotic may cause diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, and hypersensitivity reactions.

    Laboratory test interference

    Administration of penicillin G procaine may result in laboratory test interference. A false-positive reaction for glucose in the urine has been observed in patients receiving penicillins and using Benedict's solution, Fehling's solution, or Clinitest tablets for urine glucose testing. However, this reaction has not been observed with Tes-tape (glucose Enzymatic Test Strip, USP, Lilly) or Clinistix. Patients with diabetes who test their urine for glucose should use glucose tests based on enzymatic glucose oxidase reactions while on penicillin treatment.

    Serious rash

    Serious rash, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP), have been reported in patients taking beta-lactam antibiotics. When a severe cutaneous adverse reaction (SCAR) is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine immediately and consider alternative treatment.

    Pregnancy

    Use of penicillins in human pregnancy has not shown any evidence of harmful effects on the fetus. Animal data have also not demonstrated any evidence of impaired fertility or harmful fetal effects. However, there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women showing conclusively that harmful effects of penicillins on the fetus can be excluded. Because animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response, penicillin G procaine should be used in pregnant women only if clearly needed.[31217]

    Breast-feeding

    Penicillins are excreted in breast milk. Use penicillin G procaine with caution in a breast-feeding woman. However, unless the infant is allergic to penicillins, breast-feeding is generally safe during maternal penicillin G procaine therapy. Breast milk concentrations range from 0.015 to 0.37 mcg/mL with a milk:plasma ratio of 0.02 to 0.13. Penicillins may cause diarrhea, candidiasis, and skin rash in the breast-feeding infant. Observe the infant for potential effects.

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    Severe

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome / Delayed / Incidence not known
    acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) / Delayed / Incidence not known
    toxic epidermal necrolysis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    laryngeal edema / Rapid / Incidence not known
    anaphylactoid reactions / Rapid / Incidence not known
    Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) / Delayed / Incidence not known
    vasculitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    anaphylactic shock / Rapid / Incidence not known
    exfoliative dermatitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    serum sickness / Delayed / Incidence not known
    seizures / Delayed / Incidence not known
    skin atrophy / Delayed / Incidence not known
    cyanosis / Early / Incidence not known
    tissue necrosis / Early / Incidence not known
    myelitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    C. difficile-associated diarrhea / Delayed / Incidence not known
    hemolytic anemia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    methemoglobinemia / Early / Incidence not known

    Moderate

    eosinophilia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    edema / Delayed / Incidence not known
    depression / Delayed / Incidence not known
    confusion / Early / Incidence not known
    hallucinations / Early / Incidence not known
    bleeding / Early / Incidence not known
    skin ulcer / Delayed / Incidence not known
    superinfection / Delayed / Incidence not known
    pseudomembranous colitis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    elevated hepatic enzymes / Delayed / Incidence not known
    leukopenia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    thrombocytopenia / Delayed / Incidence not known

    Mild

    tongue discoloration / Delayed / 2.0-5.0
    nausea / Early / 2.0-5.0
    diarrhea / Early / 2.0-5.0
    vomiting / Early / 2.0-5.0
    rash / Early / Incidence not known
    fever / Early / Incidence not known
    maculopapular rash / Early / Incidence not known
    chills / Rapid / Incidence not known
    pruritus / Rapid / Incidence not known
    urticaria / Rapid / Incidence not known
    arthralgia / Delayed / Incidence not known
    anxiety / Delayed / Incidence not known
    weakness / Early / Incidence not known
    agitation / Early / Incidence not known
    injection site reaction / Rapid / Incidence not known
    pallor / Early / Incidence not known
    ecchymosis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction / Early / Incidence not known

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Acetaminophen: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen. (Minor) Due to the high protein binding of aspirin, it could displace or be displaced from binding sites by other highly protein-bound drugs, such as penicillins. Also, aspirin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Overall, this combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Magnesium Salicylate; Phenyltoloxamine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen. (Minor) Due to high protein binding, salicylates could be displaced from binding sites, or could displace other highly protein-bound drugs such as penicillins, and sulfonamides. An enhanced effect of the displaced drug may occur.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Phenyltoloxamine; Salicylamide: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine : (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine; Phenyltoloxamine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Codeine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Doxylamine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Dichloralphenazone; Isometheptene: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Diphenhydramine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Hydrocodone: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Oxycodone: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Pamabrom; Pyrilamine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Pentazocine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Propoxyphene: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Acetaminophen; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Aminosalicylate sodium, Aminosalicylic acid: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as aminosalicylic acid, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Amyl Nitrite: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as nitrates, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Articaine; Epinephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as articaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Aspirin, ASA: (Minor) Due to the high protein binding of aspirin, it could displace or be displaced from binding sites by other highly protein-bound drugs, such as penicillins. Also, aspirin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Overall, this combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine: (Minor) Due to the high protein binding of aspirin, it could displace or be displaced from binding sites by other highly protein-bound drugs, such as penicillins. Also, aspirin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Overall, this combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Minor) Due to the high protein binding of aspirin, it could displace or be displaced from binding sites by other highly protein-bound drugs, such as penicillins. Also, aspirin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Overall, this combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine: (Minor) Due to the high protein binding of aspirin, it could displace or be displaced from binding sites by other highly protein-bound drugs, such as penicillins. Also, aspirin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Overall, this combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Minor) Due to the high protein binding of aspirin, it could displace or be displaced from binding sites by other highly protein-bound drugs, such as penicillins. Also, aspirin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Overall, this combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Orphenadrine: (Minor) Due to the high protein binding of aspirin, it could displace or be displaced from binding sites by other highly protein-bound drugs, such as penicillins. Also, aspirin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Overall, this combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Aspirin, ASA; Carisoprodol: (Minor) Due to the high protein binding of aspirin, it could displace or be displaced from binding sites by other highly protein-bound drugs, such as penicillins. Also, aspirin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Overall, this combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Aspirin, ASA; Carisoprodol; Codeine: (Minor) Due to the high protein binding of aspirin, it could displace or be displaced from binding sites by other highly protein-bound drugs, such as penicillins. Also, aspirin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Overall, this combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Aspirin, ASA; Citric Acid; Sodium Bicarbonate: (Minor) Due to the high protein binding of aspirin, it could displace or be displaced from binding sites by other highly protein-bound drugs, such as penicillins. Also, aspirin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Overall, this combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Aspirin, ASA; Dipyridamole: (Minor) Due to the high protein binding of aspirin, it could displace or be displaced from binding sites by other highly protein-bound drugs, such as penicillins. Also, aspirin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Overall, this combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Aspirin, ASA; Omeprazole: (Minor) Due to the high protein binding of aspirin, it could displace or be displaced from binding sites by other highly protein-bound drugs, such as penicillins. Also, aspirin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Overall, this combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Aspirin, ASA; Oxycodone: (Minor) Due to the high protein binding of aspirin, it could displace or be displaced from binding sites by other highly protein-bound drugs, such as penicillins. Also, aspirin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Overall, this combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Aspirin, ASA; Pravastatin: (Minor) Due to the high protein binding of aspirin, it could displace or be displaced from binding sites by other highly protein-bound drugs, such as penicillins. Also, aspirin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Overall, this combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Belladonna Alkaloids; Ergotamine; Phenobarbital: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as phenobarbital, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Benzalkonium Chloride; Benzocaine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as benzocaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Benzhydrocodone; Acetaminophen: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Benzocaine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as benzocaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Benzocaine; Butamben; Tetracaine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as benzocaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Bupivacaine Liposomal: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as bupivacaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Bupivacaine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as bupivacaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Bupivacaine; Epinephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as bupivacaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Bupivacaine; Lidocaine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as bupivacaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen. (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as lidocaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Bupivacaine; Meloxicam: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as bupivacaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Butalbital; Acetaminophen: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Butalbital; Acetaminophen; Caffeine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Butalbital; Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Codeine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Caffeine; Sodium Benzoate: (Moderate) Antibiotics that undergo tubular secretion such as penicillins may compete with phenylacetlyglutamine and hippuric acid for active tubular secretion. The overall usefulness of sodium benzoate; sodium phenylacetate is due to the excretion of its metabolites. An increase in metabolite concentrations could contribute to failed treatment and worsening of the patient's clinical status. This combination should be used with caution.
    Chloroquine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as chloroquine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Cholestyramine: (Moderate) Cholestyramine can bind with and possibly decrease the oral absorption of penicillin G. To minimize drug interactions, administer penicillin at least 1 hour before or at least 4 to 6 hours after the administration of cholestyramine.
    Choline Salicylate; Magnesium Salicylate: (Minor) Due to high protein binding, salicylates could be displaced from binding sites, or could displace other highly protein-bound drugs such as penicillins, and sulfonamides. An enhanced effect of the displaced drug may occur.
    Colestipol: (Moderate) Colestipol can bind with and possibly decrease the oral absorption of penicillin G. To minimize drug interactions, administer penicillin at least 1 hour before or at least 4 to 6 hours after the administration of colestipol.
    Cyclophosphamide: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as cyclophosphamide, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Dapsone: (Moderate) Coadministration of dapsone with penicillin G procaine may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Advise patients to discontinue treatment and seek immediate medical attention with any signs or symptoms of methemoglobinemia.
    Desogestrel; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Dichlorphenamide: (Moderate) Use of dichlorphenamide and with OAT1 substrates like penicillin G is not recommended because of increased penicillin G exposure. If use cannot be avoided, monitor for increased adverse effects due to increased penicillin G exposure. Dichlorphenamide inhibits OAT1. Dichlorphenamide also increases potassium excretion and can cause hypokalemia and should be used cautiously with other drugs that may cause hypokalemia including penicillin G. Measure potassium concentrations at baseline and periodically during dichlorphenamide treatment. If hypokalemia occurs or persists, consider reducing the dose or discontinuing dichlorphenamide therapy.
    Dienogest; Estradiol valerate: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Digoxin: (Minor) Displacement of penicillins from plasma protein binding sites by highly protein bound drugs like digoxin will elevate the level of free penicillin in the serum. The clinical significance of this interaction is unclear. It is recommended to monitor these patients for increased adverse effects.
    Drospirenone: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Drospirenone; Estetrol: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Drospirenone; Estradiol: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Drospirenone; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Drospirenone; Ethinyl Estradiol; Levomefolate: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Elagolix; Estradiol; Norethindrone acetate: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Erythromycin; Sulfisoxazole: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as sulfonamides, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen. Sulfonamides may also compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Use this combination with caution, and monitor patients for increased side effects.
    Estradiol; Levonorgestrel: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Estradiol; Norethindrone: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Estradiol; Norgestimate: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ethacrynic Acid: (Minor) Ethacrynic acid may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. This combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Ethinyl Estradiol: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Levonorgestrel; Folic Acid; Levomefolate: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norelgestromin: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norethindrone Acetate: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norgestrel: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ethynodiol Diacetate; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Etonogestrel; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Flutamide: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as flutamide, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Fosphenytoin: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as fosphenytoin, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Furosemide: (Minor) Furosemide may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. This combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Hydralazine; Isosorbide Dinitrate, ISDN: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as nitrates, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Hydroxyurea: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as hydroxyurea, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Ifosfamide: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as ifosfamide, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Indomethacin: (Minor) Indomethacin may compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. This combination should be used with caution and patients monitored for increased side effects.
    Isosorbide Dinitrate, ISDN: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as nitrates, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Isosorbide Mononitrate: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as nitrates, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Leflunomide: (Moderate) Closely monitor for penicillin G-induced side effects such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or seizures when these drugs are used together. In some patients, a dosage reduction of penicillin G may be required. Following oral administration, leflunomide is metabolized to an active metabolite, teriflunomide, which is responsible for essentially all of leflunomide's in vivo activity. Teriflunomide is an inhibitor of the renal uptake organic anion transporter OAT3. Use of teriflunomide with penicillin G, a substrate of OAT3, may increase penicillin G plasma concentrations.
    Leuprolide; Norethindrone: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Levonorgestrel: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Levonorgestrel; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Levonorgestrel; Ethinyl Estradiol; Ferrous Bisglycinate: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Lidocaine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as lidocaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Lidocaine; Prilocaine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as lidocaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen. (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as prilocaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Magnesium Salicylate: (Minor) Due to high protein binding, salicylates could be displaced from binding sites, or could displace other highly protein-bound drugs such as penicillins, and sulfonamides. An enhanced effect of the displaced drug may occur.
    Mepivacaine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as mepivacaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Mepivacaine; Levonordefrin: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as mepivacaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Mestranol; Norethindrone: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Methotrexate: (Major) Penicillins may reduce the renal clearance of methotrexate. Increased serum concentrations of methotrexate with concomitant hematologic and gastrointestinal toxicity have been observed with concurrent administration of high or low doses of methotrexate and penicillins. Patients should be carefully monitored while receiving this combination.
    Metoclopramide: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with metoclopramide may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue procaine and any other agents that may cause methemoglobinemia. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Nitisinone: (Moderate) Monitor for increased penicillin-related adverse effects if coadministered with nitisinone. Increased penicillin exposure is possible. Nitisinone inhibits OAT3. Penicillin is an OAT3 substrate.
    Nitrates: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as nitrates, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Nitrofurantoin: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as nitrofurantoin, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Nitroglycerin: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as nitrates, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Norethindrone Acetate; Ethinyl Estradiol; Ferrous fumarate: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Norethindrone: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Norethindrone; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Norethindrone; Ethinyl Estradiol; Ferrous fumarate: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Norgestimate; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Norgestrel: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Oral Contraceptives: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Phenobarbital: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as phenobarbital, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Phenobarbital; Hyoscyamine; Atropine; Scopolamine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as phenobarbital, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Phenytoin: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as phenytoin, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Prilocaine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as prilocaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Prilocaine; Epinephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as prilocaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Primaquine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as primaquine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Primidone: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as primidone, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Probenecid: (Minor) Probenecid competitively inhibits renal tubular secretion and causes higher, prolonged serum levels of penicillins. In general, this pharmacokinetic interaction is not harmful and can be used therapeutically if needed.
    Probenecid; Colchicine: (Minor) Probenecid competitively inhibits renal tubular secretion and causes higher, prolonged serum levels of penicillins. In general, this pharmacokinetic interaction is not harmful and can be used therapeutically if needed.
    Pyrimethamine; Sulfadoxine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as sulfonamides, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen. Sulfonamides may also compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Use this combination with caution, and monitor patients for increased side effects.
    Quinine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as quinine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Rasburicase: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as rasburicase, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Relugolix; Estradiol; Norethindrone acetate: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Ropivacaine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as ropivacaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Salsalate: (Minor) Due to high protein binding, salicylates could be displaced from binding sites or could displace other highly protein-bound drugs such as penicillins. An enhanced effect of the displaced drug may occur.
    Segesterone Acetate; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Moderate) It was previously thought that antibiotics may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives containing estrogens due to stimulation of estrogen metabolism or a reduction in estrogen enterohepatic circulation via changes in GI flora. One retrospective study reviewed the literature to determine the effects of oral antibiotics on the pharmacokinetics of contraceptive estrogens and progestins, and also examined clinical studies in which the incidence of pregnancy with oral contraceptives (OCs) and antibiotics was reported. It was concluded that the antibiotics ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole, ofloxacin, roxithromycin, temafloxacin, and tetracycline did not alter plasma levels of oral contraceptives. Antituberculous drugs (e.g., rifampin) were the only agents associated with OC failure and pregnancy. Based on the study results, these authors recommended that back-up contraception may not be necessary if OCs are used reliably during oral antibiotic use. Another review of the subject concurred with these data, but noted that individual patients have been identified who experienced significant decreases in plasma concentrations of combined OC components and who appeared to ovulate; the agents most often associated with these changes were rifampin, tetracyclines, and penicillins and their derivatives. These authors concluded that because females most at risk for OC failure or noncompliance may not be easily identified and the true incidence of such events may be under-reported, and given the serious consequence of unwanted pregnancy, that recommending an additional method of contraception during short-term antibiotic use (i.e., amoxicillin, chloramphenicol, neomycin, nitrofurantoin, sulfonamides, etc.) may be justified. During long-term antibiotic administration, the risk for drug interaction with OCs is less clear, but alternative or additional contraception may be advisable in selected circumstances. Data regarding progestin-only contraceptives or for newer combined contraceptive deliveries (e.g., patches, rings) are not available.
    Sodium Benzoate; Sodium Phenylacetate: (Moderate) Antibiotics that undergo tubular secretion such as penicillins may compete with phenylacetlyglutamine and hippuric acid for active tubular secretion. The overall usefulness of sodium benzoate; sodium phenylacetate is due to the excretion of its metabolites. An increase in metabolite concentrations could contribute to failed treatment and worsening of the patient's clinical status. This combination should be used with caution.
    Sodium picosulfate; Magnesium oxide; Anhydrous citric acid: (Major) Prior or concomitant use of antibiotics with sodium picosulfate; magnesium oxide; anhydrous citric acid may reduce efficacy of the bowel preparation as conversion of sodium picosulfate to its active metabolite bis-(p-hydroxy-phenyl)-pyridyl-2-methane (BHPM) is mediated by colonic bacteria. If possible, avoid coadministration. Certain antibiotics (i.e., tetracyclines and quinolones) may chelate with the magnesium in sodium picosulfate; magnesium oxide; anhydrous citric acid solution. Therefore, these antibiotics should be taken at least 2 hours before and not less than 6 hours after the administration of sodium picosulfate; magnesium oxide; anhydrous citric acid solution.
    Sulfadiazine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as sulfonamides, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen. Sulfonamides may also compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Use this combination with caution, and monitor patients for increased side effects.
    Sulfamethoxazole; Trimethoprim, SMX-TMP, Cotrimoxazole: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as sulfonamides, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen. Sulfonamides may also compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Use this combination with caution, and monitor patients for increased side effects.
    Sulfasalazine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as sulfonamides, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen. Sulfonamides may also compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Use this combination with caution, and monitor patients for increased side effects.
    Sulfisoxazole: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as sulfonamides, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen. Sulfonamides may also compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Use this combination with caution, and monitor patients for increased side effects.
    Sulfonamides: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as sulfonamides, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen. Sulfonamides may also compete with penicillin for renal tubular secretion, increasing penicillin serum concentrations. Use this combination with caution, and monitor patients for increased side effects.
    Teriflunomide: (Moderate) Teriflunomide is an inhibitor of the renal uptake organic anion transporter OAT3. Use of teriflunomide with penicillin G, a substrate of OAT3, may increase penicillin G plasma concentrations. Monitor for increased adverse effects from penicillin G, such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or seizures. Adjust the dose of penicillin G as necessary and clinically appropriate.
    Tetracaine: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with other local anesthetics, such as tetracaine, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other local anesthetic. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Tetracyclines: (Major) Avoid the coadministration of tetracycline antibiotics with penicillins as tetracyclines may interfere with the bactericidal action of penicillins.
    Tramadol; Acetaminophen: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as acetaminophen, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Typhoid Vaccine: (Major) Antibiotics which possess bacterial activity against salmonella typhi organisms may interfere with the immunological response to the live typhoid vaccine. Allow 24 hours or more to elapse between the administration of the last dose of the antibiotic and the live typhoid vaccine.
    Valproic Acid, Divalproex Sodium: (Moderate) Coadministration of penicillin G procaine with oxidizing agents, such as valproic acid, may increase the risk of developing methemoglobinemia. Monitor patients closely for signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia if coadministration is necessary. If methemoglobinemia occurs or is suspected, discontinue penicillin G procaine and any other oxidizing agents. Depending on the severity of symptoms, patients may respond to supportive care; more severe symptoms may require treatment with methylene blue, exchange transfusion, or hyperbaric oxygen.
    Warfarin: (Moderate) The concomitant use of warfarin with many classes of antibiotics, including penicillins, may result in an increased INR thereby potentiating the risk for bleeding. Inhibition of vitamin K synthesis due to alterations in the intestinal flora may be a mechanism; however, concurrent infection is also a potential risk factor for elevated INR. Monitor patients for signs and symptoms of bleeding. Additionally, increased monitoring of the INR, especially during initiation and upon discontinuation of the antibiotic, may be necessary.

    PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

    Pregnancy

    Use of penicillins in human pregnancy has not shown any evidence of harmful effects on the fetus. Animal data have also not demonstrated any evidence of impaired fertility or harmful fetal effects. However, there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women showing conclusively that harmful effects of penicillins on the fetus can be excluded. Because animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response, penicillin G procaine should be used in pregnant women only if clearly needed.[31217]

    Penicillins are excreted in breast milk. Use penicillin G procaine with caution in a breast-feeding woman. However, unless the infant is allergic to penicillins, breast-feeding is generally safe during maternal penicillin G procaine therapy. Breast milk concentrations range from 0.015 to 0.37 mcg/mL with a milk:plasma ratio of 0.02 to 0.13. Penicillins may cause diarrhea, candidiasis, and skin rash in the breast-feeding infant. Observe the infant for potential effects.

    MECHANISM OF ACTION

    Penicillin G procaine is a beta-lactam antibiotic. It is mainly bactericidal in action. It inhibits the third and final stage of bacterial cell wall synthesis by preferentially binding to specific penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) located inside the bacterial cell wall. Penicillin-binding proteins are responsible for several different steps in the synthesis of the cell wall and are found in quantities of several hundred to several thousand molecules per bacterial cell. Penicillin-binding proteins vary among different bacterial species. Thus, the intrinsic activity of penicillin G, as well as the other penicillins, against a particular organism depends on its ability to gain access to and bind with the necessary PBP. Like all beta-lactam antibiotics, penicillin G's ability to interfere with PBP-mediated cell wall synthesis ultimately leads to cell lysis. Lysis is mediated by bacterial cell wall autolytic enzymes (i.e., autolysins). The relationship between PBPs and autolysins is unclear, but it is possible that the beta-lactam antibiotic interferes with an autolysin inhibitor.
     
    Beta-lactams exhibit concentration-independent or time-dependent killing. In vitro and in vivo animal studies have demonstrated that the major pharmacodynamic parameter that determines efficacy for beta-lactams is the amount of time free (non-protein bound) drug concentrations exceed the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the organism. This microbiological killing pattern is due to the mechanism of action, which is acylation of PBPs. There is a maximum proportion of PBPs that can be acylated; therefore, once maximum acylation has occurred, killing rates cannot increase. Free beta-lactam concentrations do not have to remain above the MIC for the entire dosing interval.
     
    The susceptibility interpretive criteria for penicillin are delineated by pathogen. The MICs are defined for Streptococcus pneumoniae in cases without meningitis as susceptible at 2 mcg/mL or less, intermediate at 4 mcg/mL, and resistant at 8 mcg/mL or more. The MICs are defined for beta-hemolytic Streptococcus sp. as susceptible at 0.12 mcg/mL or less. The MICs are defined for Staphylococcus sp. as susceptible at 0.12 mcg/mL or less and resistant at 0.25 mcg/mL or more. The MICs are defined for Streptococcus sp. viridans group as susceptible at 0.12 mcg/mL or less, intermediate at 0.25 to 2 mcg/mL, and resistant at 4 mcg/mL or more.[63320] [63321]

    PHARMACOKINETICS

    Procaine penicillin G is administered by intramuscular injection. Approximately 60% of penicillin G is bound to albumin. Penicillin G is rapidly eliminated via renal tubular excretion. A dose of 300,000 units of penicillin G procaine contains 120 mg of procaine. When large doses of penicillin G procaine are administered (e.g., 4.8 million units) procaine may reach toxic serum concentrations (see Dosage section for Maximum Dosage Limits).

    Intramuscular Route

    Following intramuscular administration, a tissue depot is created at the site of IM injection and active drug is slowly released into the systemic circulation. Penicillin G serum concentrations are lower but more prolonged with penicillin G procaine compared to aqueous penicillin G administration. Compared with penicillin G benzathine, however, penicillin G procaine reaches higher serum concentrations but has less prolonged drug levels. When high, sustained serum concentrations are required, aqueous penicillin G, administered either IM or IV, should be used. IM administration of penicillin G procaine results in penicillin serum concentrations which peak within 4 hours and slowly decrease over the next 15 to 20 hours. Penicillin serum concentrations are detected for up to 5 to 7 days post administration.