PDR MEMBER LOGIN:
  • PDR Search

    Required field
  • Advertisement
  • CLASSES

    Benzodiazepine Sedative/Hypnotics

    BOXED WARNING

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), CNS depression, coadministration with other CNS depressants, pulmonary disease, respiratory depression, respiratory insufficiency, sleep apnea

    The most serious reactions of temazepam are CNS depression and respiratory depression. As with other benzodiazepines, temazepam should not be used in patients with known respiratory depression. Use with extreme caution in patients with severe pulmonary disease or conditions associated with compromised respiratory function or respiratory insufficiency such as sleep apnea or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Additionally, avoid coadministration with other CNS depressants, especially opioids, unless no other alternatives are available as coadministration significantly increases the risk for respiratory depression, low blood pressure, and death.

    DEA CLASS

    Rx, schedule IV

    DESCRIPTION

    Oral benzodiazepine; shorter half-life than flurazepam and no active metabolites; for insomnia.

    COMMON BRAND NAMES

    Restoril

    HOW SUPPLIED

    Restoril/Temazepam Oral Cap: 7.5mg, 15mg, 22.5mg, 30mg

    DOSAGE & INDICATIONS

    For the short-term treatment of insomnia.
    Oral dosage
    Adults

    The usual dose is 15 mg PO given 30 minutes before bedtime. If needed, may increase to 30 mg PO before bedtime. In debilitated patients, initiate with 7.5 mg PO at bedtime, and generally, do not exceed 15 mg PO at bedtime. In some patients, 7.5 mg/night may be sufficient.

    Geriatric Adults

    7.5 mg PO given 30 minutes before bedtime. The risk of oversedation, dizziness, confusion, ataxia and falls increases significantly with larger doses of benzodiazepines in elderly patients. Generally, do not exceed 15 mg/night PO. Max: 30 mg/night if clinically indicated based upon response and tolerability. The federal Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) regulates the use of sedative/hypnotics in long-term care facility (LTCF) residents. Max: 15 mg/day PO in residents meeting the criteria for treatment, except when documentation is provided showing that higher doses are necessary to maintain or improve the resident's functional status. All sleep medications should be used in accordance with approved product labeling. If the sleep agent is used routinely and is beyond the manufacturer's recommendations for duration of use, the facility should attempt a quarterly taper unless clinically contraindicated as defined in the OBRA guidelines.

    MAXIMUM DOSAGE

    Adults

    30 mg/day PO.

    Elderly

    30 mg/day PO.

    Adolescents

    Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    Children

    Safety and efficacy have not been established.

    DOSING CONSIDERATIONS

    Hepatic Impairment

    It appears no dosage adjustment is needed. Although a slight decrease in clearance is apparent in patients with cirrhosis, the difference is not enough to warrant changes in the normal dosing of the drug. Adjust to patient response and tolerance.

    Renal Impairment

    Specific guidelines for dosage adjustments in renal impairment are not available; it appears that no dosage adjustments are needed.

    ADMINISTRATION

    A Med Guide that provides information about proper use and risks of sedative-hypnotics should be dispensed with each new prescription.

    Oral Administration

    Administer temazepam at bedtime.

    STORAGE

    Restoril:
    - Store at 77 degrees F; excursions permitted to 59-86 degrees F

    CONTRAINDICATIONS / PRECAUTIONS

    General Information

    Flumazenil, a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, is indicated for partial or complete reversal of the depressive effects of benzodiazepines, and may be useful in overdose situations (see Flumazenil monograph). The prescriber should be aware of the risk for seizure activity with flumazenil use, particularly in long-term users of benzodiazepines or patients presenting with a cyclic antidepressant overdose.

    Benzodiazepine hypersensitivity

    Temazepam is contraindicated in any patient with a known or suspected hypersensitivity to temazepam or with sensitivity to any component of the formulation. Reactions including anaphylaxis or angioedema may become evident as early as the initial dose. Patients should be instructed on the appropriate action in the event of an allergic reaction. Treatment with temazepam should not be re-initiated in patients who experience angioedema after administration of the drug. Patients with a benzodiazepine hypersensitivity to other benzodiazepines may experience cross-sensitivity to temazepam.

    Bipolar disorder, depression, mania, myasthenia gravis, Parkinson's disease, psychosis, suicidal ideation

    Occasionally, pre-existing depression may emerge or worsen with the use of benzodiazepines; therefore, temazepam should be used prudently in patients with major depression or psychosis. Temazepam should be administered cautiously and prescribed in the smallest amount possible to patients with suicidal ideation or a history of suicide attempt. In bipolar disorder, mania and hypomania have been reported in conjunction with the use of benzodiazepines. Use caution in patients with a neuromuscular disease, such as muscular dystrophy, myotonia, or myasthenia gravis as these conditions can be exacerbated. Patients with late stage Parkinson's disease may experience worsening of their psychosis or impaired cognition with administration of benzodiazepines. Benzodiazepines may also cause incoordination or paradoxical reactions that may worsen symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

    Pain

    As with all benzodiazepines, the use of temazepam may worsen severe pain. Benzodiazepines do not provide analgesic, antidepressant or antipsychotic effects.

    Alcoholism, complex sleep-related behaviors, driving or operating machinery, ethanol ingestion, ethanol intoxication

    Due to CNS depressive effects, patients should be cautioned against driving or operating machinery until they know how temazepam may affect them. Because temazepam can cause drowsiness and a decreased level of consciousness, there is a higher risk of falls, particularly in the elderly, with the potential for subsequent severe injuries. Increased CNS and respiratory depressant effects may be seen when temazepam is used with alcohol; ethanol ingestion should be avoided during temazepam use. Ethanol intoxication may increase the risk of serious CNS or respiratory depressant effects. Patients with alcoholism should be under careful surveillance if temazepam must be used. Sedative-hypnotic medications also have the potential to cause complex sleep-related behaviors. Complex behavior such as "sleep-driving" (i.e., driving while not fully awake after ingestion of a sedative-hypnotic, with amnesia for the event) have been reported. These events can occur in sedative-hypnotic-naive as well as in sedative-hypnotic-experienced persons. Although behaviors such as sleep-driving may occur with sedative-hypnotics alone at therapeutic doses, the use of alcohol and other CNS depressants with sedative-hypnotics appears to increase the risk of such behaviors, as does the use of sedative-hypnotics at doses exceeding the maximum recommended dose. Due to the risk to the patients and the community, discontinuation of sedative-hypnotics should be strongly considered for patients who report a "sleep-driving" episode. Other complex behaviors (e.g., preparing and eating food, making phone calls, or having sex) have been reported in patients who are not fully awake after taking a sedative-hypnotic. As with sleep-driving, patients usually do not remember these events.[41542]

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), CNS depression, coadministration with other CNS depressants, pulmonary disease, respiratory depression, respiratory insufficiency, sleep apnea

    The most serious reactions of temazepam are CNS depression and respiratory depression. As with other benzodiazepines, temazepam should not be used in patients with known respiratory depression. Use with extreme caution in patients with severe pulmonary disease or conditions associated with compromised respiratory function or respiratory insufficiency such as sleep apnea or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Additionally, avoid coadministration with other CNS depressants, especially opioids, unless no other alternatives are available as coadministration significantly increases the risk for respiratory depression, low blood pressure, and death.

    Abrupt discontinuation, benzodiazepine dependence, seizure disorder, seizures, status epilepticus, substance abuse

    Temazepam can cause physical and psychological dependence, and should be used with extreme caution in patients with known, suspected or a history of substance abuse. Tolerance (or tachyphylaxis) may develop to the sedative effects of benzodiazepines. Abrupt discontinuation of temazepam after prolonged use should be avoided. Abrupt discontinuation of benzodiazepine therapy has been reported to cause withdrawal symptoms, seizures and status epilepticus, especially following high dose or prolonged therapy (see Adverse Effects). However, benzodiazepine dependence can occur following administration of therapeutic doses for as few as 1—2 weeks, and withdrawal symptoms may be seen following the discontinuation of therapy. Patients with a history of a seizure disorder or who are taking other drugs that lower the seizure threshold (i.e., TCAs, phenothiazines) should not be withdrawn abruptly from benzodiazepines due to the risk of precipitating a seizure. Temazepam should be withdrawn slowly, using a gradual dosage-tapering schedule. During benzodiazepine withdrawal in general, the greatest risk of seizure appears to be during the first 24 to 72 hours.

    Closed-angle glaucoma

    Many benzodiazepines are contraindicated in patients with acute closed-angle glaucoma. However, the manufacturers of temazepam do not contraindicate its use in patients with any type of glaucoma. The mechanistic rational for this contraindication has been questioned, as benzodiazepines do not have antimuscarinic activity and do not raise intraocular pressure. Benzodiazepines may be used in patients with open-angle glaucoma who are receiving appropriate therapy.

    Porphyria

    The administration of temazepam can exacerbate acute intermittent porphyria, so the drug should be used with caution in patients with this condition.

    Infants, labor, obstetric delivery, pregnancy

    Temazepam is classified in FDA pregnancy risk category X. Temazepam should not be used during pregnancy. Rule out the possibility that females of child-bearing potential are be pregnant prior to initiating therapy and institute adequate birth control measures. Positive evidence of human fetal risk exists based on investigational, marketing, or human studies. Fetal abnormalities have been reported in infants whose mothers used benzodiazepines during the first trimester of pregnancy. There may also be non-teratogenic risks associated with benzodiazepines during the perinatal period, including neonatal flaccidity, respiratory suppression, feeding difficulties, and hypothermia in infants born to mothers who received benzodiazepines late in pregnancy. Abrupt withdrawal of temazepam may lead to seizure activity in the mother. Even a mild seizure may pose hazards to the developing fetus. If a woman becomes pregnant while taking temazepam, she should be counseled regarding the potential risks to the fetus. Temazepam has no established use in labor or obstetric delivery, including cesarean section.

    Breast-feeding

    According to the manufacturer, caution is advisable when administering temazepam to women who are breast-feeding an infant. Temazepam is excreted into human breast milk. In one study, ten breast-feeding mothers received 10—20 mg of temazepam for >= 2 days for insomnia. Temazepam was detectable in the milk of only one women, with before- and after-feed levels of 28 and 26 ng/ml, respectively. The milk:plasma ratio was 0.12. No adverse effects were noted in the nursing infant. Temazepam is considered by the American Academy of Pediatrics to be a drug for which the effect on the nursing infant is not known but may be of concern. If any benzodiazepine is used by a breast-feeding mother, monitor the infant for adverse effects, such as sedation. Zolpidem, a possible alternative agent for consideration, has also been assessed for excretion into breast milk,; the effects of zolpidem exposure on the breast-feeding infant have not been evaluated but the American Academy of Pediatrics has considered zolpidem usually compatible with lactation based on the available data (see Zolpidem monograph). Lactating women should avoid breast-feeding at times of peak drug concentrations, and observe the infant for any indications of adverse events, like sedation, increased crying, poor feeding, or irritability. Consider the benefits of breast-feeding, the risk of potential infant drug exposure, and the risk of an untreated or inadequately treated condition. If a breast-feeding infant experiences an adverse effect related to a maternally ingested drug, healthcare providers are encouraged to report the adverse effect to the FDA.

    Hepatic disease

    Temazepam should be administered cautiously to patients with severe hepatic disease because the elimination half-life of the drug can be prolonged, possibly resulting in toxicity. Patients with hepatic disease are more likely to experience adverse CNS reactions and should receive reduced initial dosages.

    Renal failure, renal impairment

    Temazepam should be administered cautiously to patients with renal impairment or renal failure; in general, initial dose selection should be in the lower range and dosage titration should proceed cautiously. Assess renal function during prolonged therapy and adjust dosage as clinically indicated. No active metabolites are excreted renally during temazepam use; therefore, it may be a more appropriate benzodiazepine in patients with renal impairment.

    Dementia, geriatric

    The clearance and/or elimination of many drugs are reduced in geriatric patients. Delayed elimination can either intensify or prolong the actions of adverse reactions of temazepam. The impairment of cognitive and motor function may be more marked in this patient group and lower initial dosage is recommended together with close monitoring. Because temazepam can cause drowsiness and a decreased level of consciousness, there is a higher risk of falls, particularly in the elderly, with the potential for subsequent severe injuries. Since the risk oversedation, dizziness, confusion, and/or ataxia increases substantially with larger doses of benzodiazepines in elderly and debilitated patients, 7.5 mg of temazepam is recommended as the initial dosage. According to the Beers Criteria, benzodiazepines are considered potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) in geriatric patients and avoidance is generally recommended, although some agents may be appropriate for conditions such as seizure disorders, rapid eye movement sleep disorders, benzodiazepine or ethanol withdrawal, severe generalized anxiety disorder, or peri-procedural anesthesia. Older adults have an increased sensitivity to benzodiazepines. In general, benzodiazepines increase the risk of cognitive impairment, delirium, falls, fractures, and motor vehicle accidents in older adults. Avoid use in geriatric patients with the following conditions due to the potential for symptom exacerbation or adverse effects: delirium (new-onset or worsening delirium), dementia (adverse CNS effects), and history of falls/fractures (ataxia, impaired psychomotor function, syncope, and additional falls). If a benzodiazepine must be used in a patient with a history of falls or fractures, consider reducing the use of other CNS-active medications that increase the risk of falls and fractures and implement other strategies to reduce fall risk.[63923] The federal Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) regulates medication use in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs). OBRA provides dosing guidance for temazepam. When temazepam is used as a sedative, use should be accompanied by non-pharmacologic interventions; maximize treatment of underlying conditions (if applicable). The use of sedating medications for individuals with diagnosed sleep apnea requires careful assessment, documented clinical rationale, and close monitoring. Exceptions to the OBRA provisions include: single dose sedative use for a dental or medical procedure or short-term sedative use during initiation of treatment for depression, pain, or other comorbid condition until symptoms improve or are effectively treated. Benzodiazepines may increase the risk of confusion, sedation, and falls. When a drug is used to induce sleep, treat a sleep disorder, manage behavior, stabilize mood, or treat a psychiatric disorder, the facility should attempt periodic tapering of the medication or provide documentation of medical necessity per the OBRA guidelines.[60742]

    Children, neonates

    The safe and effective use of temazepam in neonates, infants, children, and adolescents under 18 years old has not been established. Children are generally more sensitive to the CNS effects of the benzodiazepines.

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    Severe

    neonatal abstinence syndrome / Early / Incidence not known
    teratogenesis / Delayed / Incidence not known
    angioedema / Rapid / Incidence not known
    anaphylactoid reactions / Rapid / Incidence not known
    neonatal respiratory depression / Rapid / Incidence not known

    Moderate

    euphoria / Early / 1.5-1.5
    confusion / Early / 1.3-1.3
    blurred vision / Early / 1.3-1.3
    ataxia / Delayed / 0.5-0.9
    palpitations / Early / 0.5-0.9
    dyspnea / Early / 0.5-0.9
    amnesia / Delayed / 0-0.5
    nystagmus / Delayed / 0-0.5
    hallucinations / Early / 0-0.5
    tolerance / Delayed / 10.0
    psychological dependence / Delayed / 10.0
    physiological dependence / Delayed / 10.0
    withdrawal / Early / 10.0
    memory impairment / Delayed / Incidence not known
    complex sleep-related behaviors / Early / Incidence not known
    hypotension / Rapid / Incidence not known
    respiratory depression / Rapid / Incidence not known

    Mild

    drowsiness / Early / 9.1-9.1
    fatigue / Early / 4.8-4.8
    dizziness / Early / 4.5-4.5
    lethargy / Early / 4.5-4.5
    anxiety / Delayed / 2.0-2.0
    diarrhea / Early / 1.7-1.7
    weakness / Early / 1.4-1.4
    vertigo / Early / 1.2-1.2
    nausea / Early / 0-1.0
    tremor / Early / 0.5-0.9
    vomiting / Early / 0.5-0.9
    ocular irritation / Rapid / 0.5-0.9
    hyperhidrosis / Delayed / 0.5-0.9
    back pain / Delayed / 0.5-0.9
    agitation / Early / 0-0.5
    restlessness / Early / 0-0.5
    somnambulism / Early / Incidence not known
    nightmares / Early / Incidence not known
    insomnia / Early / Incidence not known

    DRUG INTERACTIONS

    Acetaminophen; Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine: (Minor) Patients taking benzodiazepines for insomnia should not use caffeine-containing products prior to going to bed as these products may antagonize the sedative effects of the benzodiazepine.
    Acetaminophen; Butalbital: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use.
    Acetaminophen; Butalbital; Caffeine: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use. (Minor) Patients taking benzodiazepines for insomnia should not use caffeine-containing products prior to going to bed as these products may antagonize the sedative effects of the benzodiazepine.
    Acetaminophen; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid prescribing opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use. (Minor) Patients taking benzodiazepines for insomnia should not use caffeine-containing products prior to going to bed as these products may antagonize the sedative effects of the benzodiazepine.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine: (Minor) Patients taking benzodiazepines for insomnia should not use caffeine-containing products prior to going to bed as these products may antagonize the sedative effects of the benzodiazepine.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid prescribing opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Minor) Patients taking benzodiazepines for insomnia should not use caffeine-containing products prior to going to bed as these products may antagonize the sedative effects of the benzodiazepine.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Magnesium Salicylate; Phenyltoloxamine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Minor) Patients taking benzodiazepines for insomnia should not use caffeine-containing products prior to going to bed as these products may antagonize the sedative effects of the benzodiazepine.
    Acetaminophen; Caffeine; Phenyltoloxamine; Salicylamide: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Minor) Patients taking benzodiazepines for insomnia should not use caffeine-containing products prior to going to bed as these products may antagonize the sedative effects of the benzodiazepine.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Acetaminophen; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine; Phenyltoloxamine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Acetaminophen; Codeine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid prescribing opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Doxylamine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Acetaminophen; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Acetaminophen; Dichloralphenazone; Isometheptene: (Moderate) The CNS depressant effects of dichloralphenazone can be potentiated by benzodiazepines.
    Acetaminophen; Diphenhydramine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Acetaminophen; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Acetaminophen; Hydrocodone: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Acetaminophen; Oxycodone: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If oxycodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce dosages and titrate to clinical response. For acetaminophen; oxycodone extended-release tablets, start with 1 tablet PO every 12 hours, and for other oxycodone products, use an initial dose of oxycodone at 1/3 to 1/2 the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Acetaminophen; Pentazocine: (Major) Concomitant use of mixed opiate agonists/antagonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of mixed opiate agonists/antagonists with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If a mixed opiate agonist/antagonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the mixed opiate agonist/antagonist and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking a mixed opiate agonist/antagonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Acetaminophen; Propoxyphene: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. The dose of any opiate agonist administered with parenteral diazepam should be reduced by at least one-third.
    Acetaminophen; Tramadol: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Acrivastine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Aldesleukin, IL-2: (Moderate) Aldesleukin, IL-2 may affect CNS function significantly. Therefore, psychotropic pharmacodynamic interactions could occur following concomitant administration of drugs with significant CNS activity. Use with caution.
    Alfentanil: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Alprazolam: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of alprazolam with CNS-depressant drugs can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent.
    Amobarbital: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use.
    Amoxapine: (Moderate) Amoxapine may enhance the response to the effects of benzodiazepines and other CNS depressants. Patients should be warned of the possibility of drowsiness that may impair performance of potentially hazardous tasks such as driving an automobile or operating machinery.
    Apomorphine: (Moderate) Apomorphine causes significant somnolence. Concomitant administration of apomorphine and benzodiazepines could result in additive depressant effects.
    Apraclonidine: (Minor) No specific drug interactions were identified with systemic agents and apraclonidine during clinical trials. Theoretically, apraclonidine might potentiate the effects of CNS depressant drugs such as the anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics, including barbiturates or benzodiazepines.
    Aripiprazole: (Moderate) Due to the primary CNS effects of aripiprazole, caution should be used when aripiprazole is given in combination with other centrally-acting medications including benzodiazepines and other anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics. The intensity of sedation and orthostatic hypotension is greater during concurrent use of lorazepam and oral aripiprazole and during use of a parenteral benzodiazepine and intramuscular (IM) aripiprazole compared to aripiprazole alone; therefore, patients receiving a benzodiazepine with oral or parenteral aripiprazole should be monitored for sedation and blood pressure and the dose should be adjusted accordingly. Data from the manufacturer indicate there are no clinically significant pharmacokinetic changes when aripiprazole is given with lorazepam.
    Asenapine: (Moderate) Drugs that can cause CNS depression, if used concomitantly with asenapine, may increase both the frequency and the intensity of adverse effects such as drowsiness, sedation, and dizziness. Caution should be used when asenapine is given in combination with other centrally-acting medications including anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics (including barbiturates), buprenorphine, buprenorphine; naloxone, butorphanol, dronabinol, THC, nabilone, nalbuphine, opiate agonists, pentazocine, acetaminophen; pentazocine, aspirin, ASA; pentazocine, and pentazocine; naloxone.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use. (Minor) Patients taking benzodiazepines for insomnia should not use caffeine-containing products prior to going to bed as these products may antagonize the sedative effects of the benzodiazepine.
    Aspirin, ASA; Butalbital; Caffeine; Codeine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid prescribing opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use. (Minor) Patients taking benzodiazepines for insomnia should not use caffeine-containing products prior to going to bed as these products may antagonize the sedative effects of the benzodiazepine.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Dihydrocodeine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid prescribing opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Minor) Patients taking benzodiazepines for insomnia should not use caffeine-containing products prior to going to bed as these products may antagonize the sedative effects of the benzodiazepine.
    Aspirin, ASA; Caffeine; Orphenadrine: (Minor) Patients taking benzodiazepines for insomnia should not use caffeine-containing products prior to going to bed as these products may antagonize the sedative effects of the benzodiazepine.
    Aspirin, ASA; Carisoprodol; Codeine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid prescribing opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Aspirin, ASA; Oxycodone: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If oxycodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce dosages and titrate to clinical response. For acetaminophen; oxycodone extended-release tablets, start with 1 tablet PO every 12 hours, and for other oxycodone products, use an initial dose of oxycodone at 1/3 to 1/2 the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Atracurium: (Moderate) Concurrent use of benzodiazepines and other CNS active medications including neuromuscular blockers, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent. Lower doses of one or both agents may be required. The severity of this interaction may be increased when additional CNS depressants are given.
    Atropine; Difenoxin: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of benzodiazepines with CNS-depressant drugs, such as diphenoxylate/difenoxin, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent.
    Atropine; Diphenoxylate: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of benzodiazepines with CNS-depressant drugs, such as diphenoxylate/difenoxin, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent.
    Atropine; Hyoscyamine; Phenobarbital; Scopolamine: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use. (Moderate) Scopolamine may cause dizziness and drowsiness. Concurrent use of scopolamine and CNS depressants can adversely increase the risk of CNS depression.
    Azelastine: (Moderate) An enhanced CNS depressant effect may occur when azelastine is combined with CNS depressants including benzodiazepines.
    Azelastine; Fluticasone: (Moderate) An enhanced CNS depressant effect may occur when azelastine is combined with CNS depressants including benzodiazepines.
    Barbiturates: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use.
    Belladonna Alkaloids; Ergotamine; Phenobarbital: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use.
    Belladonna; Opium: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Benzhydrocodone; Acetaminophen: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If benzhydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Benztropine: (Moderate) CNS depressants, such as anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics, can increase the sedative effects of benztropine.
    Brimonidine: (Moderate) Based on the sedative effects of brimonidine in individual patients, brimonidine administration has potential to enhance the CNS depressants effects of the anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics including benzodiazepines.
    Brimonidine; Brinzolamide: (Moderate) Based on the sedative effects of brimonidine in individual patients, brimonidine administration has potential to enhance the CNS depressants effects of the anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics including benzodiazepines.
    Brimonidine; Timolol: (Moderate) Based on the sedative effects of brimonidine in individual patients, brimonidine administration has potential to enhance the CNS depressants effects of the anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics including benzodiazepines.
    Brompheniramine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Brompheniramine; Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) Drowsiness has been reported during administration of carbetapentane. An enhanced CNS depressant effect may occur when carbetapentane is combined with other CNS depressants including benzodiazepines. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Brompheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Brompheniramine; Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Brompheniramine; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Brompheniramine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Buprenorphine: (Major) Concomitant use of mixed opiate agonists/antagonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of mixed opiate agonists/antagonists with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If a mixed opiate agonist/antagonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the mixed opiate agonist/antagonist and titrate to clinical response. Reduce injectable buprenorphine dose by 1/2, and for the buprenorphine transdermal patch, start therapy with the 5 mcg/hour patch. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking a mixed opiate agonist/antagonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Buprenorphine; Naloxone: (Major) Concomitant use of mixed opiate agonists/antagonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of mixed opiate agonists/antagonists with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If a mixed opiate agonist/antagonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the mixed opiate agonist/antagonist and titrate to clinical response. Reduce injectable buprenorphine dose by 1/2, and for the buprenorphine transdermal patch, start therapy with the 5 mcg/hour patch. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking a mixed opiate agonist/antagonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Buspirone: (Moderate) It is common for patients to overlap anxiety treatment when switching from benzodiazepines to buspirone. Buspirone has a slow onset of action and the drug will not block the withdrawal syndrome often seen with cessation of benzodiazepine therapy in those with benzodiazepine dependence. Therefore, before starting therapy with buspirone, withdraw patients gradually from the benzodiazepine. Alternatively, conversion to buspirone therapy may require treatment overlap to allow for the downward titration of the benzodiazepine while buspirone takes effect. It should be noted that the combination of buspirone and benzodiazepines can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent.
    Butabarbital: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use.
    Butorphanol: (Major) Concomitant use of mixed opiate agonists/antagonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of mixed opiate agonists/antagonists with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If a mixed opiate agonist/antagonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the mixed opiate agonist/antagonist and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking a mixed opiate agonist/antagonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Caffeine: (Minor) Patients taking benzodiazepines for insomnia should not use caffeine-containing products prior to going to bed as these products may antagonize the sedative effects of the benzodiazepine.
    Caffeine; Ergotamine: (Minor) Patients taking benzodiazepines for insomnia should not use caffeine-containing products prior to going to bed as these products may antagonize the sedative effects of the benzodiazepine.
    Cannabidiol: (Moderate) Monitor for excessive sedation and somnolence during coadministration of cannabidiol and temazepam. CNS depressants can potentiate the effects of cannabidiol.
    Carbetapentane; Chlorpheniramine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) Drowsiness has been reported during administration of carbetapentane. An enhanced CNS depressant effect may occur when carbetapentane is combined with other CNS depressants including benzodiazepines.
    Carbetapentane; Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) Drowsiness has been reported during administration of carbetapentane. An enhanced CNS depressant effect may occur when carbetapentane is combined with other CNS depressants including benzodiazepines. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Carbetapentane; Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) Drowsiness has been reported during administration of carbetapentane. An enhanced CNS depressant effect may occur when carbetapentane is combined with other CNS depressants including benzodiazepines. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Carbetapentane; Guaifenesin: (Moderate) Drowsiness has been reported during administration of carbetapentane. An enhanced CNS depressant effect may occur when carbetapentane is combined with other CNS depressants including benzodiazepines.
    Carbetapentane; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Drowsiness has been reported during administration of carbetapentane. An enhanced CNS depressant effect may occur when carbetapentane is combined with other CNS depressants including benzodiazepines. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Drowsiness has been reported during administration of carbetapentane. An enhanced CNS depressant effect may occur when carbetapentane is combined with other CNS depressants including benzodiazepines. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Carbetapentane; Phenylephrine; Pyrilamine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) Drowsiness has been reported during administration of carbetapentane. An enhanced CNS depressant effect may occur when carbetapentane is combined with other CNS depressants including benzodiazepines. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Carbetapentane; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Drowsiness has been reported during administration of carbetapentane. An enhanced CNS depressant effect may occur when carbetapentane is combined with other CNS depressants including benzodiazepines.
    Carbetapentane; Pyrilamine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) Drowsiness has been reported during administration of carbetapentane. An enhanced CNS depressant effect may occur when carbetapentane is combined with other CNS depressants including benzodiazepines.
    Carbinoxamine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Carbinoxamine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Carbinoxamine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Carbinoxamine; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Carbinoxamine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Carbinoxamine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Cariprazine: (Moderate) Due to the CNS effects of cariprazine, caution should be used when cariprazine is given in combination with other centrally-acting medications including benzodiazepines and other anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics.
    Cenobamate: (Moderate) Monitor for excessive sedation and somnolence during coadministration of cenobamate and benzodiazepines. Concurrent use may result in additive CNS depression.
    Cetirizine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of cetirizine/levocetirizine with benzodiazepines should generally be avoided. Coadministration may increase the risk of CNS depressant-related side effects. If concurrent use is necessary, monitor for excessive sedation and somnolence.
    Cetirizine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of cetirizine/levocetirizine with benzodiazepines should generally be avoided. Coadministration may increase the risk of CNS depressant-related side effects. If concurrent use is necessary, monitor for excessive sedation and somnolence.
    Chlophedianol; Dexbrompheniramine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Chlophedianol; Dexchlorpheniramine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Chlophedianol; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Chlorcyclizine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Chlorpheniramine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Chlorpheniramine; Codeine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid prescribing opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dihydrocodeine; Phenylephrine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid prescribing opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Chlorpheniramine; Dihydrocodeine; Pseudoephedrine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid prescribing opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Chlorpheniramine; Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Chlorpheniramine; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Chlorpheniramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Chlorpheniramine; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Chlorthalidone; Clonidine: (Moderate) Clonidine has CNS depressive effects and can potentiate the actions of other CNS depressants including benzodiazepines.
    Cisapride: (Moderate) Cisapride may enhance the sedative effects of benzodiazepines. Patients should not drive or operate heavy machinery until they know how the combination affects them. Patient counseling is important, as cisapride alone does not cause drowsiness or affect psychomotor function.
    Cisatracurium: (Moderate) Concurrent use of benzodiazepines and other CNS active medications including neuromuscular blockers, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent. Lower doses of one or both agents may be required. The severity of this interaction may be increased when additional CNS depressants are given.
    Clemastine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Clobazam: (Moderate) Use clobazam with other benzodiazepines with caution due to the potential for increased risk of drowsiness and sedation.
    Clonidine: (Moderate) Clonidine has CNS depressive effects and can potentiate the actions of other CNS depressants including benzodiazepines.
    Clozapine: (Moderate) If concurrent therapy with clozapine and a benzodiazepine is necessary, it is advisable to begin with the lowest possible benzodiazepine dose and closely monitor the patient, particularly at initiation of treatment and following dose increases. Although the combination has been used safely, adverse reactions such as confusion, ataxia, somnolence, delirium, collapse, cardiac arrest, respiratory arrest, and death have occurred rarely in patients receiving clozapine concurrently or following benzodiazepine therapy. Several benzodiazepines, including clonazepam, oxazepam, flurazepam, diazepam, clobazam, flunitrazepam, and lorazepam have been implicated in these reactions. At least one case of sudden death was reported following intravenous administration of lorazepam to a patient receiving clozapine.
    Codeine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid prescribing opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Codeine; Guaifenesin: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid prescribing opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Codeine; Phenylephrine; Promethazine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid prescribing opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Codeine; Promethazine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid prescribing opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Colchicine; Probenecid: (Moderate) Probenecid may inhibit the metabolism of the benzodiazepines, including those which are metabolized by conjugation (e.g., lorazepam) or oxidation (e.g., midazolam). Probenecid has been shown to decrease lorazepam clearance by about 50% and increase its elimination half-life. In addition, pretreatment with probenecid shortened the induction time (85 vs. 109 seconds) of midazolam in presurgical patients. Patients receiving alprazolam therapy should be monitored for signs of altered benzodiazepine response when probenecid is initiated or discontinued.
    COMT inhibitors: (Major) Concomitant administration of benzodiazepines with other drugs have CNS depressant properties, including COMT inhibitors, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent. COMT inhibitors have also been associated with sudden sleep onset during activities of daily living such as driving, which has resulted in accidents in some cases. Prescribers should re-assess patients for drowsiness or sleepiness regularly throughout treatment, especially since events may occur well after the start of treatment. Patients should be advised to avoid driving or other tasks requiring mental alertness until they know how the combination affects them.
    Cyclizine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Cyproheptadine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Desflurane: (Moderate) Concurrent use with benzodiazepines can decrease the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of desflurane needed to produce anesthesia.
    Deutetrabenazine: (Moderate) Advise patients that concurrent use of deutetrabenazine and drugs that can cause CNS depression, such as temazepam, may have additive effects and worsen drowsiness or sedation.
    Dexchlorpheniramine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Dexchlorpheniramine; Dextromethorphan; Pseudoephedrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Dexmedetomidine: (Moderate) Co-administration of dexmedetomidine with benzodiazepines is likely to lead to an enhancement of CNS depression.
    Dextromethorphan; Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Dextromethorphan; Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Dicyclomine: (Moderate) Dicyclomine can cause drowsiness, so it should be used cautiously in patients receiving CNS depressants like benzodiazepines.
    Dihydrocodeine; Guaifenesin; Pseudoephedrine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid prescribing opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Dimenhydrinate: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Diphenhydramine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Diphenhydramine; Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Diphenhydramine; Ibuprofen: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Diphenhydramine; Naproxen: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Diphenhydramine; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Doxacurium: (Moderate) Concurrent use of benzodiazepines and other CNS active medications including neuromuscular blockers, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent. Lower doses of one or both agents may be required. The severity of this interaction may be increased when additional CNS depressants are given.
    Doxylamine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Doxylamine; Pyridoxine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Dronabinol: (Moderate) Use caution if the use of benzodiazepines are necessary with dronabinol, and monitor for additive dizziness, confusion, somnolence, and other CNS effects.
    Droperidol: (Major) Droperidol administration is associated with an established risk for QT prolongation and torsades de pointes. In December 2001, the FDA issued a black box warning regarding the use of droperidol and its association with QT prolongation and potential for cardiac arrhythmias based on post-marketing surveillance data. Risk factors for the development of prolonged QT syndrome may include the use of benzodiazepines. Also, droperidol and benzodiazepines can both cause CNS depression. If used with a benzodiazepine, droperidol should be initiated at a low dose and adjusted upward, with caution, as needed to achieve the desired effect.
    Drospirenone; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Drospirenone; Ethinyl Estradiol; Levomefolate: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Enflurane: (Moderate) Concomitant administration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent.
    Esketamine: (Major) Closely monitor patients receiving esketamine and benzodiazepines for sedation and other CNS depressant effects. Instruct patients who receive a dose of esketamine not to drive or engage in other activities requiring alertness until the next day after a restful sleep.
    Eszopiclone: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of benzodiazepines with eszopiclone can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. The concurrent use of eszopiclone with other anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics at bedtime or in the middle of the night is not recommended. In addition, the risk of next-day psychomotor impairment is increased during co-administration of eszopiclone and other CNS depressants, which may decrease the ability to perform tasks requiring full mental alertness such as driving. If used together, a reduction in the dose of one or both drugs may be needed.
    Ethanol: (Major) Alcohol is associated with CNS depression. The combined use of alcohol and CNS depressants can lead to additive CNS depression, which could be dangerous in tasks requiring mental alertness and fatal in overdose. Alcohol taken with other CNS depressants can lead to additive respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, or coma. Consider the patient's use of alcohol or illicit drugs when prescribing CNS depressant medications. In many cases, the patient should receive a lower dose of the CNS depressant initially if the patient is not likely to be compliant with avoiding alcohol.
    Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Desogestrel: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Ethynodiol Diacetate: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Etonogestrel: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Levonorgestrel: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Levonorgestrel; Ferrous bisglycinate: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Levonorgestrel; Folic Acid; Levomefolate: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norelgestromin: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norethindrone Acetate: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norethindrone Acetate; Ferrous fumarate: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norethindrone: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norethindrone; Ferrous fumarate: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norgestimate: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Ethinyl Estradiol; Norgestrel: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Ethotoin: (Moderate) Hydantoins may increase the hepatic clearance of benzodiazepines. Interactions have been documented with benzodiazepines metabolized by oxidation or conjugation.
    Etomidate: (Moderate) Concomitant administration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent.
    Fentanyl: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Flumazenil: (Major) Flumazenil competes with benzodiazepines for binding at the GABA/benzodiazepine-receptor complex, the specific binding site of benzodiazepines. Because binding at the receptor is competitive and flumazenil has a much shorter duration of action than do most benzodiazepines, it is possible for the effects of flumazenil to dissipate sooner than the effects of the benzodiazepine. Flumazenil does not affect the pharmacokinetics of the benzodiazepines. Abrupt awakening can cause dysphoria, agitation, and possibly increased adverse effects. If administered to patients who have received a benzodiazepine chronically, abrupt interruption of benzodiazepine agonism by flumazenil can induce benzodiazepine withdrawal including seizures. Flumazenil has minimal effects on benzodiazepine-induced respiratory depression; suitable ventilatory support should be available, especially in treating acute benzodiazepine overdose. Flumazenil does not reverse the actions of barbiturates, opiate agonists, or tricyclic antidepressants.
    Fluoxetine; Olanzapine: (Moderate) Although oral formulations of olanzapine and benzodiazepines may be used together, additive effects on respiratory depression and/or CNS depression are possible. Drugs that can cause CNS depression, if used concomitantly with olanzapine, can increase both the frequency and the intensity of adverse effects such as drowsiness, sedation, dizziness, and orthostatic hypotension. Besides ethanol, clinicians should use other anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics cautiously with olanzapine.
    Food: (Major) Coadministration of marijuana with benzodiazepines may result in an exaggerated sedative effect. Instruct patients receiving these medications concurrently not to drive or operate machinery.
    Fosphenytoin: (Moderate) Hydantoins may increase the hepatic clearance of benzodiazepines. Interactions have been documented with benzodiazepines metabolized by oxidation or conjugation.
    Fospropofol: (Moderate) Concomitant administration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent.
    Gabapentin: (Major) Concomitant use of benzodiazepines with gabapentin may cause excessive sedation, somnolence, and respiratory depression. If concurrent use is necessary, initiate gabapentin at the lowest recommended dose and monitor patients for symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of excessive CNS depression and respiratory depression.
    General anesthetics: (Moderate) Concomitant administration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent.
    Green Tea: (Minor) Patients taking benzodiazepines for insomnia should not use caffeine-containing products, such as green tea, prior to going to bed as these products may antagonize the sedative effects of the benzodiazepine.
    Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Guaifenesin; Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Guaifenesin; Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Guanabenz: (Moderate) Guanabenz is associated with sedative effects. Guanabenz can potentiate the effects of CNS depressants such as benzodiazepines, when administered concomitantly.
    Guanfacine: (Moderate) Guanfacine has been associated with sedative effects and can potentiate the actions of other CNS depressants including benzodiazepines.
    Haloperidol: (Moderate) Caution should be exercised with simultaneous use of these agents. Haloperidol can potentiate the actions of other CNS depressants, such as the benzodiazepines. Complex sleep behaviors are more likely to occur when temazepam is taken with other CNS depressants. Warn patients of the possibility of drowsiness that may impair performance of potentially hazardous tasks such as driving an automobile or operating machinery.
    Halothane: (Moderate) Concomitant administration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent.
    Homatropine; Hydrocodone: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Hydantoins: (Moderate) Hydantoins may increase the hepatic clearance of benzodiazepines. Interactions have been documented with benzodiazepines metabolized by oxidation or conjugation.
    Hydrochlorothiazide, HCTZ; Methyldopa: (Moderate) Methyldopa is associated with sedative effects. Methyldopa can potentiate the effects of CNS depressants such as barbiturates, benzodiazepines, opiate agonists, or phenothiazines when administered concomitantly.
    Hydrocodone: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Hydrocodone; Ibuprofen: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Hydrocodone; Phenylephrine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines. (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Hydrocodone; Potassium Guaiacolsulfonate: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Hydrocodone; Potassium Guaiacolsulfonate; Pseudoephedrine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Hydrocodone; Pseudoephedrine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydrocodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosage and titrate to clinical response; for hydrocodone extended-release products, initiate hydrocodone at 20% to 30% of the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Avoid opiate cough medications in patients taking benzodiazepines.
    Hydromorphone: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If hydromorphone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce the initial dosage of hydromorphone and titrate to clinical response; for hydromorphone extended-release tablets, use 1/3 to 1/2 of the estimated hydromorphone starting dose. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Hydroxyzine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Ibuprofen; Oxycodone: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If oxycodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce dosages and titrate to clinical response. For acetaminophen; oxycodone extended-release tablets, start with 1 tablet PO every 12 hours, and for other oxycodone products, use an initial dose of oxycodone at 1/3 to 1/2 the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Iloperidone: (Moderate) Drugs that can cause CNS depression, if used concomitantly with iloperidone, may increase both the frequency and the intensity of adverse effects such as drowsiness, sedation, and dizziness. Caution should be used when iloperidone is given in combination with other centrally-acting medications including anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics.
    Isoflurane: (Moderate) Concomitant administration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent.
    Ketamine: (Moderate) Concomitant administration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent.
    Lasmiditan: (Moderate) Monitor for excessive sedation and somnolence during coadministration of lasmiditan and benzodiazepines. Concurrent use may result in additive CNS depression.
    Lemborexant: (Moderate) Monitor for excessive sedation and somnolence during use of lemborexant with benzodiazepines. Dosage adjustments may be necessary when administered together because of potentially additive CNS effects. Use of more than 2 hypnotics should be avoided due to the additive CNS depressant and complex sleep-related behaviors that may occur. While anxiolytic medications may be used concurrently with lemborexant, a reduction in dose of one or both agents may be needed. The risk of next-day impairment, including impaired driving, is increased if lemborexant is taken with other CNS depressants.
    Levocetirizine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of cetirizine/levocetirizine with benzodiazepines should generally be avoided. Coadministration may increase the risk of CNS depressant-related side effects. If concurrent use is necessary, monitor for excessive sedation and somnolence.
    Levomethadyl: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of benzodiazepines with CNS-depressant drugs, including opiate agonists, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent.
    Levomilnacipran: (Moderate) Concurrent use of many CNS active drugs, including benzodiazepines, with levomilnacipran has not been evaluated by the manufacturer. Therefore, caution is advisable when combining anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics or other psychoactive medications with levomilnacipran.
    Levorphanol: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If levorphanol is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce the initial dose of levorphanol by approximately 50% or more. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Lithium: (Moderate) Because lithium has the potential to impair cognitive and motor skills, caution is advisable during concurrent use of other medications with centrally-acting effects including anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics.
    Lofexidine: (Moderate) Monitor for excessive hypotension and sedation during coadministration of lofexidine and benzodiazepines. Lofexidine can potentiate the effects of CNS depressants such as benzodiazepines.
    Lumateperone: (Moderate) Monitor for excessive sedation and somnolence during coadministration of lumateperone and benzodiazepines. Concurrent use may result in additive CNS depression.
    Lurasidone: (Moderate) Due to the CNS effects of lurasidone, caution should be used when lurasidone is given in combination with other centrally acting medications such as anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics, including benzodiazepines. In one study, co-administration of lurasidone and midazolam increased the Cmax and AUC of midazolam by about 21% and 44%, respectively, compared to midazolam alone; however, dosage adjustment of midazolam based upon pharmacokinetic parameters is not required during concurrent use of lurasidone.
    Magnesium Salts: (Minor) Because of the CNS-depressant effects of magnesium sulfate, additive central-depressant effects can occur following concurrent administration with CNS depressants such as benzodiazepines. Caution should be exercised when using these agents concurrently.
    Maprotiline: (Moderate) Benzodiazepines or other CNS depressants should be combined cautiously with maprotiline because they could cause additive depressant effects and possible respiratory depression or hypotension. The combination of benzodiazepines and maprotiline is commonly used clinically and is considered to be safe as long as patients are monitored for excessive adverse effects from either agent. Maprotiline may lower the seizure threshold, so when benzodiazepines are used for anticonvulsant effects the patient should be monitored for desired clinical outcomes.
    Meclizine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Melatonin: (Major) Use caution when combining melatonin with the benzodiazepines; when the benzodiazepine is used for sleep, co-use of melatonin should be avoided. Use of more than 1 agent for hypnotic purposes may increase the risk for over-sedation, CNS effects, or sleep-related behaviors. Be alert for unusual changes in moods or behaviors. Use caution when combining melatonin with benzodiazepines for other uses. Patients reporting unusual sleep-related behaviors should likely discontinue melatonin use. In animal studies, melatonin has been shown to increase benzodiazepine binding to receptor sites. In one case report, a benzodiazepine-dependent woman with an 11 year history of insomnia weaned and discontinued her benzodiazepine prescription within a few days without rebound insomnia or apparent benzodiazepine withdrawal when melatonin was given. In another case report, the ingestion of excessive melatonin along with normal doses of chlordiazepoxide and an antidepressant resulted in lethargy and short-term amnestic responses. Both cases suggest additive pharmacodynamic effects. In a clinical trial, there was clear evidence for a transitory pharmacodynamic interaction between melatonin and another hypnotic agent one hour following co-dosing. Concomitant administration resulted in increased impairment of attention, memory and coordination compared to the hypnotic agent alone.
    Meperidine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Meperidine; Promethazine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Mephobarbital: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use.
    Meprobamate: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of benzodiazepines with meprobamate can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. If used together, a reduction in the dose of one or both drugs may be needed.
    Methadone: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If methadone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduced dosages are recommended; in opioid-naive adults, use an initial dose of methadone 2.5 mg PO every 12 hours. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Methocarbamol: (Moderate) Concurrent use of benzodiazepines and other CNS active medications including skeletal muscle relaxants, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent. Lower doses of one or both agents may be required. The severity of this interaction may be increased when additional CNS depressants are given.
    Methohexital: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use.
    Methscopolamine: (Moderate) CNS depression can be increased when methscopolamine is combined with other CNS depressants such as any anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics.
    Methyldopa: (Moderate) Methyldopa is associated with sedative effects. Methyldopa can potentiate the effects of CNS depressants such as barbiturates, benzodiazepines, opiate agonists, or phenothiazines when administered concomitantly.
    Metoclopramide: (Minor) Combined use of metoclopramide and other CNS depressants, such as anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics, can increase possible sedation.
    Metyrapone: (Moderate) Metyrapone may cause dizziness and/or drowsiness. Other drugs that may also cause drowsiness, such as benzodiazepines, should be used with caution. Additive drowsiness and/or dizziness is possible.
    Metyrosine: (Moderate) The concomitant administration of metyrosine with benzodiazepines can result in additive sedative effects.
    Milnacipran: (Moderate) Concurrent use of many CNS-active drugs with milnacipran or levomilnacipran has not been evaluated by the manufacturer. Therefore, caution is advisable when combining anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics or other psychoactive medications with these medications.
    Minocycline: (Minor) Injectable minocycline contains magnesium sulfate heptahydrate. Because of the CNS-depressant effects of magnesium sulfate, additive central-depressant effects can occur following concurrent administration with CNS depressants such as benzodiazepines. Caution should be exercised when using these agents concurrently.
    Mirtazapine: (Moderate) Consistent with the pharmacology of mirtazapine and the drug's side effect profile, additive effects may occur with other CNS-active agents, including benzodiazepines.
    Mivacurium: (Moderate) Concurrent use of benzodiazepines and other CNS active medications including neuromuscular blockers, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent. Lower doses of one or both agents may be required. The severity of this interaction may be increased when additional CNS depressants are given.
    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors: (Moderate) The CNS-depressant effects of MAOIs can be potentiated with concomitant administration of other drugs known to cause CNS depression including benzodiazepines. MAOIs can cause a variable change in seizure patterns, so careful monitoring of the patient with epilepsy is required when benzodiazepines are used in the treatment of epilepsy.
    Morphine: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If morphine is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosages and titrate to clinical response. For extended-release tablets, start with morphine 15 mg PO every 12 hours, and for extended-release capsules, start with 30 mg PO every 24 hours or less. Use an initial morphine; naltrexone dose of 20 mg/0.8 mg PO every 24 hours. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Morphine; Naltrexone: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If morphine is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce initial dosages and titrate to clinical response. For extended-release tablets, start with morphine 15 mg PO every 12 hours, and for extended-release capsules, start with 30 mg PO every 24 hours or less. Use an initial morphine; naltrexone dose of 20 mg/0.8 mg PO every 24 hours. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Nabilone: (Major) Nabilone should not be taken with benzodiazepines or other sedative/hypnotic agents because these substances can potentiate the central nervous system effects of nabilone. Additive drowsiness and CNS depression can occur.
    Nalbuphine: (Major) Concomitant use of mixed opiate agonists/antagonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of mixed opiate agonists/antagonists with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If a mixed opiate agonist/antagonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the mixed opiate agonist/antagonist and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking a mixed opiate agonist/antagonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Neuromuscular blockers: (Moderate) Concurrent use of benzodiazepines and other CNS active medications including neuromuscular blockers, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent. Lower doses of one or both agents may be required. The severity of this interaction may be increased when additional CNS depressants are given.
    Nitroglycerin: (Minor) Nitroglycerin can cause hypotension. This action may be additive with other agents that can cause hypotension such as benzodiazepines. Patients should be monitored more closely for hypotension if nitroglycerin is used concurrently with benzodiazepines.
    Olanzapine: (Moderate) Although oral formulations of olanzapine and benzodiazepines may be used together, additive effects on respiratory depression and/or CNS depression are possible. Drugs that can cause CNS depression, if used concomitantly with olanzapine, can increase both the frequency and the intensity of adverse effects such as drowsiness, sedation, dizziness, and orthostatic hypotension. Besides ethanol, clinicians should use other anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics cautiously with olanzapine.
    Oxybutynin: (Moderate) Additive CNS depression may occur when oxybutynin is used concomitantly with other CNS-depressant drugs, including anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics.
    Oxycodone: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If oxycodone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, reduce dosages and titrate to clinical response. For acetaminophen; oxycodone extended-release tablets, start with 1 tablet PO every 12 hours, and for other oxycodone products, use an initial dose of oxycodone at 1/3 to 1/2 the usual dosage. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Oxymorphone: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If oxymorphone is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use an initial dose of oxymorphone at 1/3 to 1/2 the usual dosage and titrate to clinical response. If the extended-release oxymorphone tablets are used concurrently with a CNS depressant, use an initial dosage of 5 mg PO every 12 hours. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Paliperidone: (Moderate) Drugs that can cause CNS depression, such as benzodiazepines, can increase both the frequency and the intensity of adverse effects such as drowsiness, sedation, and dizziness when coadministered with paliperidone. Monitor for signs and symptoms of CNS depression and advise patients to avoid driving or engaging in other activities requiring mental alertness until they know how this combination affects them.
    Pancuronium: (Moderate) Concurrent use of benzodiazepines and other CNS active medications including neuromuscular blockers, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent. Lower doses of one or both agents may be required. The severity of this interaction may be increased when additional CNS depressants are given.
    Papaverine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of papaverine with potent CNS depressants such as benzodiazepines could lead to enhanced sedation.
    Pentazocine: (Major) Concomitant use of mixed opiate agonists/antagonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of mixed opiate agonists/antagonists with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If a mixed opiate agonist/antagonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the mixed opiate agonist/antagonist and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking a mixed opiate agonist/antagonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Pentazocine; Naloxone: (Major) Concomitant use of mixed opiate agonists/antagonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of mixed opiate agonists/antagonists with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If a mixed opiate agonist/antagonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the mixed opiate agonist/antagonist and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking a mixed opiate agonist/antagonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Pentobarbital: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use.
    Perampanel: (Moderate) Patients taking benzodiazepines with perampanel may experience increased CNS depression. Monitor patients for adverse effects; dose adjustment of either drug may be necessary. Use of midazolam in healthy subjects who received perampanel 6 mg once daily for 20 days decreased the AUC and Cmax of midazolam by 13% and 15%, respectively, possibly due to weak induction of CYP3A4 by perampanel; the specific clinical significance of this interaction is unknown.
    Phenobarbital: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use.
    Phenothiazines: (Moderate) Phenothiazines are CNS depressant drugs that may have cumulative effects when administered concurrently and they should be used cautiously with anxiolytic, sedative, and hypnotic type drugs, such as the benzodiazepines. Caution should be exercised during simultaneous use of these agents due to potential excessive CNS effects or additive hypotension. Additionally, sleep-related behaviors, such as sleep-driving, are more likely to occur during concurrent use of other CNS depressants than with sedatives alone. Monitor for additive effects, unusual moods or behaviors, and warn about the potential effects to driving and other activities.
    Phentermine; Topiramate: (Moderate) Topiramate has the potential to cause CNS depression as well as other cognitive and/or neuropsychiatric adverse reactions. The CNS depressant effects of topiramate can be potentiated pharmacodynamically by concurrent use of CNS depressant agents such as the benzodiazepines. Concurrent use of topiramate and benzodiazepines associated with thrombocytopenia (e.g., clonazepam, lorazepam, and clobazam), may also increase the risk of bleeding; monitor patients appropriately during benzodiazepine therapy.
    Phenylephrine: (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Phenylephrine; Promethazine: (Moderate) The therapeutic effect of phenylephrine may be decreased in patients receiving benzodiazepines. Monitor patients for decreased pressor effect if these agents are administered concomitantly.
    Phenytoin: (Moderate) Hydantoins may increase the hepatic clearance of benzodiazepines. Interactions have been documented with benzodiazepines metabolized by oxidation or conjugation.
    Pimozide: (Moderate) Due to the effects of pimozide on cognition, it should be used cautiously with other CNS depressants including benzodiazepines.
    Pramipexole: (Major) Concomitant administration of benzodiazepines with CNS-depressant drugs, including pramipexole, can potentiate the CNS effects.
    Prasterone, Dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA (Dietary Supplements): (Major) Prasterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA may inhibit the metabolism of benzodiazepines (e.g., alprazolam, estazolam, midazolam) which undergo CYP3A4-mediated metabolism. In one study of elderly volunteers, half of the patients received DHEA 200 mg/day PO for 2 weeks, followed by a single dose of triazolam 0.25 mg. Triazolam clearance was reduced by close to 30% in the DHEA-pretreated patients vs. the control group; however, the effect of DHEA on CYP3A4 metabolism appeared to vary widely among subjects. While more study is needed, benzodiazepine-induced CNS sedation and other adverse effects might be increased in some individuals if DHEA is co-administered.
    Prasterone, Dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA (FDA-approved): (Major) Prasterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA may inhibit the metabolism of benzodiazepines (e.g., alprazolam, estazolam, midazolam) which undergo CYP3A4-mediated metabolism. In one study of elderly volunteers, half of the patients received DHEA 200 mg/day PO for 2 weeks, followed by a single dose of triazolam 0.25 mg. Triazolam clearance was reduced by close to 30% in the DHEA-pretreated patients vs. the control group; however, the effect of DHEA on CYP3A4 metabolism appeared to vary widely among subjects. While more study is needed, benzodiazepine-induced CNS sedation and other adverse effects might be increased in some individuals if DHEA is co-administered.
    Pregabalin: (Major) Concomitant use of benzodiazepines with pregabalin may cause excessive sedation, somnolence, and respiratory depression. If concurrent use is necessary, initiate pregabalin at the lowest recommended dose and monitor patients for symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of excessive CNS depression and respiratory depression.
    Primidone: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use.
    Probenecid: (Moderate) Probenecid may inhibit the metabolism of the benzodiazepines, including those which are metabolized by conjugation (e.g., lorazepam) or oxidation (e.g., midazolam). Probenecid has been shown to decrease lorazepam clearance by about 50% and increase its elimination half-life. In addition, pretreatment with probenecid shortened the induction time (85 vs. 109 seconds) of midazolam in presurgical patients. Patients receiving alprazolam therapy should be monitored for signs of altered benzodiazepine response when probenecid is initiated or discontinued.
    Procarbazine: (Minor) CNS depressants benzodiazepines can potentiate the CNS depression caused by procarbazine therapy, so these drugs should be used together cautiously.
    Propofol: (Moderate) Concomitant administration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent.
    Propoxyphene: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. The dose of any opiate agonist administered with parenteral diazepam should be reduced by at least one-third.
    Quetiapine: (Moderate) Somnolence is a commonly reported adverse effect of quetiapine; coadministration of quetiapine with anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics, or other CNS depressants may result in additive sedative effects.
    Ramelteon: (Moderate) Ramelteon is a sleep-promoting agent; therefore, additive pharmacodynamic effects are possible when combining ramelteon with benzodiazepines or other miscellaneous anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics. Pharmacokinetic interactions have been observed with the use of zolpidem. Use of ramelteon 8 mg/day for 11 days and a single dose of zolpidem 10 mg resulted in an increase in the median Tmax of zolpidem of about 20 minutes; exposure to zolpidem was unchanged. Ramelteon use with hypnotics of any kind is considered duplicative therapy and these drugs are generally not co-administered.
    Rapacuronium: (Moderate) Concurrent use of benzodiazepines and other CNS active medications including neuromuscular blockers, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent. Lower doses of one or both agents may be required. The severity of this interaction may be increased when additional CNS depressants are given.
    Rasagiline: (Moderate) The CNS-depressant effects of MAOIs can be potentiated with concomitant administration of other drugs known to cause CNS depression including buprenorphine, butorphanol, dronabinol, THC, nabilone, nalbuphine, and anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics. Use these drugs cautiously with MAOIs; warn patients to not drive or perform other hazardous activities until they know how a particular drug combination affects them. In some cases, the dosages of the CNS depressants may need to be reduced.
    Remifentanil: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Benzodiazepine doses may need to be reduced up to 75% during coadministration with remifentanil. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Risperidone: (Moderate) Due to the primary CNS effects of risperidone, caution should be used when risperidone is given in combination with other centrally acting medications including anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics.
    Rocuronium: (Moderate) Concurrent use of benzodiazepines and other CNS active medications including neuromuscular blockers, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent. Lower doses of one or both agents may be required. The severity of this interaction may be increased when additional CNS depressants are given.
    Rotigotine: (Major) Concomitant use of rotigotine with other CNS depressants, such as benzodiazepines, can potentiate the sedative effects of rotigotine.
    Safinamide: (Moderate) Dopaminergic medications, including safinamide, may cause a sudden onset of somnolence which sometimes has resulted in motor vehicle accidents. Patients may not perceive warning signs, such as excessive drowsiness, or they may report feeling alert immediately prior to the event. Because of possible additive effects, advise patients about the potential for increased somnolence during concurrent use of safinamide with other sedating medications, such as benzodiazepines.
    Scopolamine: (Moderate) Scopolamine may cause dizziness and drowsiness. Concurrent use of scopolamine and CNS depressants can adversely increase the risk of CNS depression.
    Secobarbital: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use.
    Sedating H1-blockers: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Segesterone Acetate; Ethinyl Estradiol: (Minor) Ethinyl estradiol may enhance the metabolism of temazepam. Because temazepam clearance is increased by combined oral contraceptives, mean plasma concentration may be decreased. The clinical significance of this interaction is not determined.
    Sevoflurane: (Moderate) Concomitant administration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent.
    Sincalide: (Moderate) Sincalide-induced gallbladder ejection fraction may be affected by benzodiazepines. False study results are possible in patients with drug-induced hyper- or hypo-responsiveness; thorough patient history is important in the interpretation of procedure results.
    Skeletal Muscle Relaxants: (Moderate) Concomitant use of skeletal muscle relaxants with benzodiazepines can result in additive CNS depression. The severity of this interaction may be increased when additional CNS depressants are given.
    Sodium Oxybate: (Severe) Sodium oxybate should not be used in combination with CNS depressant anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics or other sedative CNS depressant drugs. Specifically, sodium oxybate use is contraindicated in patients being treated with sedative hypnotic drugs. Sodium oxybate (GHB) has the potential to impair cognitive and motor skills. For example, the concomitant use of barbiturates and benzodiazepines increases sleep duration and may contribute to rapid onset, pronounced CNS depression, respiratory depression, or coma when combined with sodium oxybate.
    Succinylcholine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of benzodiazepines and other CNS active medications including neuromuscular blockers, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent. Lower doses of one or both agents may be required. The severity of this interaction may be increased when additional CNS depressants are given.
    Sufentanil: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Suvorexant: (Moderate) CNS depressant drugs may have cumulative effects when administered concurrently and they should be used cautiously with suvorexant. A reduction in dose of the CNS depressant may be needed in some cases. These agents include the benzodiazepines.
    Tapentadol: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If tapentadol is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, a reduced initial dosage of tapentadol is recommended. If the extended-release tapentadol tablets are used concurrently with a benzodiazepine, use an initial tapentadol dose of 50 mg PO every 12 hours. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Teduglutide: (Moderate) Teduglutide may increase absorption of benzodiazepines or other psychotropic agents because of it's pharmacodynamic effect of improving intestinal absorption. In studies with teduglutide, one of the subjects was receiving concomitant treatment with prazepam and experienced dramatic deterioration in mental status progressing to coma during her first week of teduglutide therapy. Upon admission to the ICU, her benzodiazepine level was reported as >300 mcg/L. Both drugs were discontinued, and the coma resolved 5 days later. Careful monitoring and possible dose adjustment of the psychotropic agent is recommended.
    Tetrabenazine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of tetrabenazine and drugs that can cause CNS depression, such as benzodiazepines, can increase both the frequency and the intensity of adverse effects such as drowsiness, sedation, dizziness, and orthostatic hypotension.
    Thalidomide: (Major) The use of benzodiazepine anxiolytics, sedatives, or hypnotics with thalidomide may cause an additive sedative effect and should be avoided. Thalidomide frequently causes drowsiness and somnolence. Dose reductions may be required. Patients should be instructed to avoid situations where drowsiness may be a problem and not to take other medications that may cause drowsiness without adequate medical advice. Advise patients as to the possible impairment of mental and/or physical abilities required for the performance of hazardous tasks, such as driving a car or operating other complex or dangerous machinery.
    Theophylline, Aminophylline: (Moderate) Aminophylline has been reported to counteract the pharmacodynamic effects of diazepam. A proposed mechanism is competitive binding of aminophylline to adenosine receptors in the brain. Whether a similar interaction occurs with other benzodiazepines is not known. If aminophylline therapy is initiated or discontinued, monitor the clinical response to benzodiazepines. (Moderate) Theophylline has been reported to counteract the pharmacodynamic effects of diazepam. A proposed mechanism is competitive binding of theophylline to adenosine receptors in the brain. Whether a similar interaction occurs with other benzodiazepines is not known. If theophylline therapy is initiated or discontinued, monitor the clinical response to benzodiazepines.
    Thiopental: (Moderate) Additive CNS and/or respiratory depression may occur with concurrent use.
    Thiothixene: (Moderate) Thiothixene can potentiate the CNS-depressant action of other drugs such as benzodiazepines. Caution should be exercised during simultaneous use of these agents due to potential excessive CNS effects or additive hypotension.
    Tiagabine: (Moderate) Because of the possible additive effects of drugs that depress the central nervous system, benzodiazepines should be used with caution in patients receiving tiagabine.
    Tizanidine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of tizanidine and CNS depressants like the benzodiazepines can cause additive CNS depression. The severity of this interaction may be increased when additional CNS depressants are given.
    Topiramate: (Moderate) Topiramate has the potential to cause CNS depression as well as other cognitive and/or neuropsychiatric adverse reactions. The CNS depressant effects of topiramate can be potentiated pharmacodynamically by concurrent use of CNS depressant agents such as the benzodiazepines. Concurrent use of topiramate and benzodiazepines associated with thrombocytopenia (e.g., clonazepam, lorazepam, and clobazam), may also increase the risk of bleeding; monitor patients appropriately during benzodiazepine therapy.
    Tramadol: (Major) Concomitant use of opiate agonists with benzodiazepines may cause respiratory depression, hypotension, profound sedation, and death. Limit the use of opiate pain medications with benzodiazepines to only patients for whom alternative treatment options are inadequate. If concurrent use is necessary, use the lowest effective doses and minimum treatment durations needed to achieve the desired clinical effect. If an opiate agonist is initiated in a patient taking a benzodiazepine, use a lower initial dose of the opiate and titrate to clinical response. If a benzodiazepine is prescribed for an indication other than epilepsy in a patient taking an opiate agonist, use a lower initial dose of the benzodiazepine and titrate to clinical response. Educate patients about the risks and symptoms of respiratory depression and sedation.
    Trazodone: (Major) Monitor for excessive sedation and somnolence during coadministration of trazodone and benzodiazepines. Concurrent use may result in additive CNS depression.
    Tricyclic antidepressants: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of benzodiazepines with CNS-depressant drugs, such as tricyclic antidepressants, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent. Tricyclic antidepressants may also lower the seizure threshold leading to pharmacodynamic interactions with anticonvulsant benzodiazepines (i.e., clobazam, clonazepam, diazepam, and lorazepam). The plasma concentrations of imipramine and desipramine may increase an average of 31% and 20%, respectively, when administered concurrently with alprazolam. The significance of this interaction has not been described; therefore, patients should be monitored closely for symptoms of tricyclic toxicity during coadministration of these agents with alprazolam.
    Trihexyphenidyl: (Moderate) CNS depressants, such as anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics, can increase the sedative effects of trihexyphenidyl.
    Trimethobenzamide: (Moderate) The concurrent use of trimethobenzamide with other medications that cause CNS depression, like the benzodiazepines, may potentiate the effects of either trimethobenzamide or the benzodiazepine.
    Triprolidine: (Moderate) Coadministration can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. Use caution with this combination.
    Tubocurarine: (Moderate) Concurrent use of benzodiazepines and other CNS active medications including neuromuscular blockers, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent. Lower doses of one or both agents may be required. The severity of this interaction may be increased when additional CNS depressants are given.
    Valerian, Valeriana officinalis: (Major) Any substances that act on the CNS, including psychoactive drugs and drugs used as anesthetic adjuvants (e.g., barbiturates, benzodiazepines), may theoretically interact with valerian, Valeriana officinalis. The valerian derivative, dihydrovaltrate, binds at barbiturate binding sites; valerenic acid has been shown to inhibit enzyme-induced breakdown of GABA in the brain; the non-volatile monoterpenes (valepotriates) have sedative activity. These interactions are probably pharmacodynamic in nature. There is a possibility of interaction with valerian at normal prescription dosages of anxiolytics, sedatives, and hypnotics (including barbiturates and benzodiazepines). Patients who are taking barbiturates or other sedative/hypnotic drugs should avoid concomitant administration of valerian. Patients taking medications such as tricyclic antidepressants, lithium, MAOIs, skeletal muscle relaxants, SSRIs and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (e.g., duloxetine, venlafaxine) should discuss the use of herbal supplements with their health care professional prior to consuming valerian; combinations should be approached with caution in the absence of clinical data. Patients should not abruptly stop taking their prescribed psychoactive medications.
    Vecuronium: (Moderate) Concurrent use of benzodiazepines and other CNS active medications including neuromuscular blockers, can potentiate the CNS effects of either agent. Lower doses of one or both agents may be required. The severity of this interaction may be increased when additional CNS depressants are given.
    Vigabatrin: (Moderate) Vigabatrin may cause somnolence and fatigue. Drugs that can cause CNS depression, if used concomitantly with vigabatrin, may increase both the frequency and the intensity of adverse effects such as drowsiness, sedation, and dizziness. Caution should be used when vigabatrin is given in combination with benzodiazepines.
    Vilazodone: (Moderate) Due to the CNS effects of vilazodone, caution should be used when vilazodone is given in combination with other centrally acting medications such as the benzodiazepines.
    Zaleplon: (Moderate) In premarketing studies, zaleplon potentiated the CNS effects of ethanol, imipramine, and thioridazine for at least 2 to 4 hours. Other drugs that may have additive CNS effects with zaleplon but have not been studied include benzodiazepines. If used together, a reduction in the dose of one or both drugs may be needed.
    Ziprasidone: (Moderate) Ziprasidone has the potential to impair cognitive and motor skills. Additive CNS depressant effects are possible when ziprasidone is used concurrently with any CNS depressant.
    Zolpidem: (Moderate) Concomitant administration of benzodiazepines with zolpidem can potentiate the CNS effects (e.g., increased sedation or respiratory depression) of either agent. If used together, a reduction in the dose of one or both drugs may be needed. For Intermezzo brand of sublingual zolpidem tablets, reduce the dose to 1.75 mg/night. Concurrent use of zolpidem with other sedative-hypnotics, including other zolpidem products, at bedtime or the middle of the night is not recommended. In addition, sleep-related behaviors, such as sleep-driving, are more likely to occur during concurrent use of zolpidem and other CNS depressants than with zolpidem alone.

    PREGNANCY AND LACTATION

    Pregnancy

    According to the manufacturer, caution is advisable when administering temazepam to women who are breast-feeding an infant. Temazepam is excreted into human breast milk. In one study, ten breast-feeding mothers received 10—20 mg of temazepam for >= 2 days for insomnia. Temazepam was detectable in the milk of only one women, with before- and after-feed levels of 28 and 26 ng/ml, respectively. The milk:plasma ratio was 0.12. No adverse effects were noted in the nursing infant. Temazepam is considered by the American Academy of Pediatrics to be a drug for which the effect on the nursing infant is not known but may be of concern. If any benzodiazepine is used by a breast-feeding mother, monitor the infant for adverse effects, such as sedation. Zolpidem, a possible alternative agent for consideration, has also been assessed for excretion into breast milk,; the effects of zolpidem exposure on the breast-feeding infant have not been evaluated but the American Academy of Pediatrics has considered zolpidem usually compatible with lactation based on the available data (see Zolpidem monograph). Lactating women should avoid breast-feeding at times of peak drug concentrations, and observe the infant for any indications of adverse events, like sedation, increased crying, poor feeding, or irritability. Consider the benefits of breast-feeding, the risk of potential infant drug exposure, and the risk of an untreated or inadequately treated condition. If a breast-feeding infant experiences an adverse effect related to a maternally ingested drug, healthcare providers are encouraged to report the adverse effect to the FDA.

    MECHANISM OF ACTION

    Mechanism of Action: Benzodiazepines act at the level of the limbic, thalamic, and hypothalamic regions of the CNS and can produce any level of CNS depression required including sedation, hypnosis, skeletal muscle relaxation, and anticonvulsant activity. Recent evidence indicates that benzodiazepines exert their effects through enhancement of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-benzodiazepine receptor complex. GABA is an inhibitory neurotransmitter that exerts its effects at specific receptor subtypes designated GABA-A and GABA-B. GABA-A is the primary receptor subtype in the CNS and is thought to be involved in the actions of anxiolytics and sedatives.Specific benzodiazepine receptor subtypes are thought to be coupled to GABA-A receptors. Three types of BNZ receptors are located in the CNS and other tissues; the BNZ1 receptors are located in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex, the BNZ2 receptors in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord, and the BNZ3 receptors in peripheral tissues. Activation of the BNZ1 receptor is thought to mediate sleep while the BNZ2 receptor affects muscle relaxation, anticonvulsant activity, motor coordination, and memory. Benzodiazepines bind nonspecifically to BNZ1 and BNZ2 which ultimately enhances the effects of GABA. Unlike barbiturates which augment GABA responses by increasing the length of time that chloride channels are open, benzodiazepines enhance the effects of GABA by increasing GABA affinity for the GABA receptor. Binding of GABA to the site opens the chloride channel resulting in a hyperpolarized cell membrane that prevents further excitation of the cell.Benzodiazepines alleviate insomnia by decreasing the latency to sleep and increasing sleep continuity and total sleep time through their effects on GABA.

    PHARMACOKINETICS

    Temazepam is administered orally. The drug is widely distributed and is 98% protein-bound. Temazepam crosses the placenta and may be distributed into breast milk (see Contraindications). The half-life of the parent compound is 8—15 hours. Temazepam is metabolized by direct conjugation with glucuronic acid to inactive metabolites, which are then excreted in the urine.

    Oral Route

    Temazepam is rapidly absorbed. The onset of action occurs within 30—60 minutes.